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Senate Introduces Bill To Setup Legal Framework For Ethical AI Development
Last week, the U.S. Senate introduced a new bill to outlaw the unethical use of AI-generated content and deepfake technology. Called the Content Origin Protection and Integrity from Edited and Deepfaked Media Act (COPIED Act), the bill would "set new federal transparency guidelines for marking, authenticating and detecting AI-generated content, protect journalists, actors and artists against AI-driven theft, and hold violators accountable for abuses." TechSpot reports: Proposed and sponsored by Democrats Maria Cantwell of Washington and Martin Heinrich of New Mexico, along with Republican Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee, the aims to establish enforceable transparency standards in AI development [such a through watermarking]. The legislation also wants to curb unauthorized data use in training models. The senators intend to task the National Institutes of Standards and Technology with developing sensible transparency guidelines should the bill pass. [...] The senators feel that clarifying and defining what is okay and what is not regarding AI development is vital in protecting citizens, artists, and public figures from the harm that misuse of the technology could cause, particularly in creating deepfakes. The text of the bill can be read here.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Radar Images Suggest There's a Tunnel On the Moon
Longtime Slashdot reader fahrbot-bot shares a report from Gizmodo: A team of researchers think they've discovered a cave on the Moon in radar images of the lunar surface, which they posit could be a future site for an established human presence on our rocky satellite. The tunnel is in the Mare Tranquillitatis (Sea of Tranquility) pit, the deepest known pit on the Moon. (If the name is familiar to you, the Sea of Tranquility is where the Apollo 11 mission landed in 1969.) The pit formed due to a lava tube's roof collapse or a collapse of a void structure created by tectonic processes. To look for potential cave structures within the pit, the researchers studied side-looking radar images taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's Mini-RF instrument between 2009 and 2011. The team then conducted 3D radar simulations of potential geometries of the pit and its cave, to determine that the brightness they saw in radar images could be due to subsurface features. Ultimately, the team determined there is a tunnel in the pit that is between 98 feet (30 meters) long and 262ft (80m) long. The tunnel is roughly 148ft (45m) wide and is either flat or inclined with a maximum steepness of 45 degrees. "The exploration of lunar caves through future robotic missions could provide a fresh perspective on the lunar subsurface and yield new insights into the evolution of lunar volcanism," the team wrote in the paper. "Furthermore, direct exploration could confirm the presence of stable subsurface environments shielded from radiation and with optimal temperature conditions for future human utilization." The findings have been published in the journal Nature Astronomy.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Record Labels Sue Verizon After ISP 'Buried Head In Sand' Over Subscribers' Piracy
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TorrentFreak: Just before the weekend, dozens of record labels including UMG, Warner, and Sony, filed a massive copyright infringement lawsuit against Verizon at a New York federal court. In common with previous lawsuits that accused rivals of similar inaction, Verizon Communications Inc., Verizon Services Corp., and Cellco Partnership (dba Verizon Wireless), stand accused of assisting subscribers to download and share pirated music, by not doing enough to stop them. The labels' complaint introduces Verizon as one of the largest ISPs in the country, one that "knowingly provides its high-speed service to a massive community of online pirates." Knowledge of infringement, the labels say, was established at Verizon over a period of several years during which it received "hundreds of thousands" of copyright notices, referencing instances of infringement allegedly carried out by its subscribers. The complaint cites Verizon subscribers' persistent use of BitTorrent networks to download and share pirated music, with Verizon allegedly failing to curtail their activity. "While Verizon is famous for its 'Can you hear me now?' advertising campaign, it has intentionally chosen not to listen to complaints from copyright owners. Instead of taking action in response to those infringement notices as the law requires, Verizon ignored Plaintiffs' notices and buried its head in the sand," the labels write. "Undeterred, infringing subscribers identified in Plaintiffs' notices continued to use Verizon's services to infringe Plaintiffs' copyrights with impunity. Meanwhile, Verizon continued to provide its high-speed service to thousands of known repeat infringers so it could continue to collect millions of dollars from them." Through this lawsuit, which references piracy of songs recorded by artists including The Rolling Stones, Ariana Grande, Bob Dylan, Bruno Mars, Elvis Presley, Dua Lipa, Drake, and others, the labels suggest that Verizon will have no choice but to hear them now. [...] Attached to the complaint, Exhibit A contains a non-exhaustive list of the plaintiffs' copyright works allegedly infringed by Verizon's subscribers. The document is over 400 pages long, with each track listed representing potential liability for Verizon as a willful, intentional, and purposeful contributory infringer, the complaint notes. This inevitably leads to claims based on maximum statutory damages of $150,000 per copyrighted work infringed on Count I (contributory infringement). The statutory maximum of $150,000 per infringed work is also applied to Count II (vicarious infringement), based on the labels' claim that Verizon derived a direct financial benefit from the direct infringements of its subscribers. The labels' complaint can be found here (PDF).
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Italy Reconsiders Nuclear Energy 35 Years After Shutting Down Last Reactor
Italian Prime Minister Giorgia Meloni plans to revive Italy's nuclear energy sector, focusing on small modular reactors to be operational within a decade. He said that nuclear energy could constitute at least 11% of the country's electricity mix by 2050. Semafor reports: Italy's energy minister told the Financial Times that the government would introduce legislation to support investment in small modular reactors, which could be operational within 10 years. [...] In Italy, concerns about energy security since Russia's invasion of Ukraine have pushed the government to reconsider nuclear power, Bloomberg wrote. Energy minister Pichetto Fratin told the Financial Times he was confident that Italians' historic "aversion" could be overcome, as nuclear technology now has "different levels of safety and benefits families and businesses." In Italy, safety is also top of mind: The Chernobyl tragedy of 1986 was the trigger for it to cease nuclear production in the first place, and the 2011 Fukushima disaster reignited those concerns. As of April, only 51% of Italians approved of nuclear power, according to polls shared by Il Sole 24 Ore. The plan to introduce small modular reactors in Italy could add to the country's history of failure in nuclear energy, a former Italian lawmaker and researcher argued in Italian outlet Il Fatto Quotidiano, writing that these reactors are expensive and produce too little energy to justify an investment in them.They could also become obsolete within the next decade, the timeline for the government to introduce them, Italian outlet Domani added, and be overtaken by nuclear fusion reactors, which are more efficient and have "virtually no environmental impact." Italy's main oil company, Eni, has signed a deal with MIT spinout Commonwealth Fusion System, with the goal of providing the first operational nuclear fusion plant by 2030.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Microsoft Unveils a Large Language Model That Excels At Encoding Spreadsheets
Microsoft has quietly announced the first details of its new "SpreadsheetLLM," claiming it has the "potential to transform spreadsheet data management and analysis, paving the way for more intelligent and efficient user interactions." You can read more details about the model in a pre-print paper available here. Jasper Hamill reports via The Stack: One of the problems with using LLMs in spreadsheets is that they get bogged down by too many tokens (basic units of information the model processes). To tackle this, Microsoft developed SheetCompressor, an "innovative encoding framework that compresses spreadsheets effectively for LLMs." "It significantly improves performance in spreadsheet table detection tasks, outperforming the vanilla approach by 25.6% in GPT4's in-context learning setting," Microsoft added. The model is made of three modules: structural-anchor-based compression, inverse index translation, and data-format-aware aggregation. The first of these modules involves placing "structural anchors" throughout the spreadsheet to help the LLM understand what's going on better. It then removes "distant, homogeneous rows and columns" to produce a condensed "skeleton" version of the table. Index translation addresses the challenge caused by spreadsheets with numerous empty cells and repetitive values, which use up too many tokens. "To improve efficiency, we depart from traditional row-by-row and column-by-column serialization and employ a lossless inverted index translation in JSON format," Microsoft wrote. "This method creates a dictionary that indexes non-empty cell texts and merges addresses with identical text, optimizing token usage while preserving data integrity." [...] After conducting a "comprehensive evaluation of our method on a variety of LLMs" Microsoft found that SheetCompressor significantly reduces token usage for spreadsheet encoding by 96%. Moreover, SpreadsheetLLM shows "exceptional performance in spreadsheet table detection," which is the "foundational task of spreadsheet understanding." The new LLM builds on the Chain of Thought methodology to introduce a framework called "Chain of Spreadsheet" (CoS), which can "decompose" spreadsheet reasoning into a table detection-match-reasoning pipeline.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

OW2: 'The European Union Must Keep Funding Free Software'
OW2, the non-profit international consortium dedicated to developing open-source middleware, published an open letter to the European Commission today. They're urging the European Union to continue funding free software after noticing that the Next Generation Internet (NGI) programs were no longer mentioned in Cluster 4 of the 2025 Horizon Europe funding plans. OW2 argues that discontinuing NGI funding would weaken Europe's technological ecosystem, leaving many projects under-resourced and jeopardizing Europe's position in the global digital landscape. The letter reads, in part: NGI programs have shown their strength and importance to support the European software infrastructure, as a generic funding instrument to fund digital commons and ensure their long-term sustainability. We find this transformation incomprehensible, moreover when NGI has proven efficient and economical to support free software as a whole, from the smallest to the most established initiatives. This ecosystem diversity backs the strength of European technological innovation, and maintaining the NGI initiative to provide structural support to software projects at the heart of worldwide innovation is key to enforce the sovereignty of a European infrastructure. Contrary to common perception, technical innovations often originate from European rather than North American programming communities, and are mostly initiated by small-scaled organizations. Previous Cluster 4 allocated 27 millions euros to: - "Human centric Internet aligned with values and principles commonly shared in Europe"; - "A flourishing internet, based on common building blocks created within NGI, that enables better control of our digital life"; - "A structured eco-system of talented contributors driving the creation of new internet commons and the evolution of existing internet commons." In the name of these challenges, more than 500 projects received NGI funding in the first 5 years, backed by 18 organizations managing these European funding consortia.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Microsoft CTO Kevin Scott Thinks LLM 'Scaling Laws' Will Hold Despite Criticism
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: During an interview with Sequoia Capital's Training Data podcast published last Tuesday, Microsoft CTO Kevin Scott doubled down on his belief that so-called large language model (LLM) "scaling laws" will continue to drive AI progress, despite some skepticism in the field that progress has leveled out. Scott played a key role in forging a $13 billion technology-sharing deal between Microsoft and OpenAI. "Despite what other people think, we're not at diminishing marginal returns on scale-up," Scott said. "And I try to help people understand there is an exponential here, and the unfortunate thing is you only get to sample it every couple of years because it just takes a while to build supercomputers and then train models on top of them." LLM scaling laws refer to patterns explored by OpenAI researchers in 2020 showing that the performance of language models tends to improve predictably as the models get larger (more parameters), are trained on more data, and have access to more computational power (compute). The laws suggest that simply scaling up model size and training data can lead to significant improvements in AI capabilities without necessarily requiring fundamental algorithmic breakthroughs. Since then, other researchers have challenged the idea of persisting scaling laws over time, but the concept is still a cornerstone of OpenAI's AI development philosophy. Scott's comments can be found around the 46-minute mark.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

FBI Has 'Gained Access' To the Trump Rally Shooter's Phone [UPDATE]
UPDATE 7/15/24 3:05 p.m. EDT: In a press release published this afternoon, the FBI said they "successfully gained access to Thomas Matthew Crooks' phone, and they continue to analyze his electronic devices." The bureau added that it has completed its search of the subject's residence and vehicle, and "conducted nearly 100 interviews of law enforcement personnel, event attendees, and other witnesses." Original Story: July 15, 16:45 UTC: Investigators are working to break into the phone of the man who shot at former President Donald Trump at a Pennsylvania rally on Saturday. The Verge: The FBI said in a statement that it had obtained the shooter's phone "for examination." Officials told reporters in a conference call on Sunday, as reported by The New York Times, that agents in Pennsylvania were unable to break into the phone. It's been shipped to the FBI's lab in Quantico, Virginia, where the FBI hopes to get past the phone's password protection, the Times reported. Investigators are still looking for insight into the motives of Thomas Matthew Crooks, a 20-year-old from Bethel Park, Pennsylvania, who they identified as the gunman. Kevin Rojek, the FBI special agent in charge in Pittsburgh, told the Times and other outlets that the agency has access to some of Crooks' text messages, but they haven't shed much light on his beliefs.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Nation's Last Morse Code Station Comes Back To Life On Annual 'Night of Nights' In Point Reyes
On July 12, 1999, the last Morse code message was sent from a Bay Area radio station, marking the end of an era. Every July 12, the Historic KPH Maritime Radio Receiving Station in Point Reyes revives the golden age of maritime radio, with volunteers exchanging Morse code messages worldwide. The Mercury News reports: Friday's "Night of Nights" event, which commemorates the long-gone stations and the skilled radiotelegraph operators who linked ships to shore, starts at 5:01 p.m. -- precisely one minute after the 1999 message ended. Operators will keep working until 11 p.m. "We're carrying on," said historical society president Richard Dillman, 80, who learned Morse code as a boy. "Morse code is not dead." The event, based at KPH's stations that are now part of the wild and windswept Point Reyes National Seashore, northwest of San Francisco, is not open to the public. But amateur radio operators around the world can participate by sending messages and exchanging greetings. The operating frequencies of the historical society's amateur station, under the call sign K6KPH, are 3550, 7050, 14050, 18097.5 and 21050. Radiogrammed messages arrive from as far away as New Zealand and Europe, rich with memories of rewarding careers or poignant tributes to lost loved ones. "Dear dad, we love you and we miss you so much," said one. The station uses the original historic KPH transmitters, receivers, antennas and other equipment, carefully repaired and restored by the society's experts. [...] All over the Pacific coast, stations closed. KPH's receiving headquarters -- an Art Deco cube built between 1929 and 1931, its entrance framed by a tunnel of cypress trees -- was acquired by the National Park Service in 1999. Its transmission station is located on a windswept bluff in Bolinas. [Historical society president Richard Dillman] and friend Tom Horsfall resolved to repair, restore and operate KPH as a way to honor the men and women who for 100 years had served ships in the North Pacific and Indian Ocean. "It was a brotherhood," said Dillman. "There was camaraderie -- a love of Morse code and the ability to do a job well." [...] They pitched their ambitious plan to the National Park Service. "At first, I was skeptical about their proposal," said Don Neubacher, the Seashore's former Superintendent. "But over time, I realized the Maritime Radio Historical Society, led by Richard Dillman, was a gift for the National Park Service." "I was impressed by the overwhelming knowledge of early wireless and ship-to-shore communication," he said, "and their lifelong commitment to saving this critical piece of Point Reyes history." With a dozen society volunteers from all over the Bay Area -- all over the age of 60, self-described "radio squirrels" -- they went to work. They meet on Saturday mornings over coffee and breakfast "services" dubbed "The Church of the Continuous Wave," sometimes ogling over radio schematics. Then, for a few hours, they broadcast news and weather.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Gemini AI Platform Accused of Scanning Google Drive Files Without User Permission
Last week, Senior Advisor on AI Governance at the Center for Democracy & Technology, Kevin Bankston, took to X to report that Google's Gemini AI was caught summarizing his private tax return on Google Drive without his permission. "Despite attempts to disable the feature, Bankston found that Gemini's continued to operate in Google Drive, raising questions about Google's handling of user data and privacy settings," writes TechRadar's Craig Hale. From the report: After failing to find the right controls to disable Gemini's integration, the Advisor asked Google's ChatGPT-rivalling AI chatbot on two occasions to pinpoint the settings. A second, more detailed response still brought no joy: "Gemini is *not* in Apps and services on my dashboard (1st option), and I didn't have a profile pic in the upper right of the Gemini page (2nd)." With help from another X user, Bankston found the control, which was already disabled, highlighting either a malfunctioning control or indicating that further settings are hidden elsewhere. However, previous Google documentation has confirmed that the company will not use Google Workspace data to train or improve its generative AI services or to feed targeted ads. Bankston theorizes that his previous participation in Google Workspace Labs might have influenced Gemini's behavior. The Gemini side panel in Google Drive for PDFs can be closed if a user no longer wishes to access generative AI summaries.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Federal Court Blocks Net Neutrality Rules
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: A federal appeals court has agreed to halt the reinstatement of net neutrality rules until August 5th, while the court considers whether more permanent action is justified. It's the latest setback in a long back and forth on net neutrality -- the principle that internet service providers (ISPs) should not be able to block or throttle internet traffic in a discriminatory manner. The Federal Communications Commission has sought to achieve this by reclassifying ISPs under Title II of the Communications Act, which gives the agency greater regulatory oversight. The Democratic-led agency enacted net neutrality rules under the Obama administration, only for those rules to be repealed under former President Donald Trump's FCC. The current FCC, which has three Democratic and two Republican commissioners, voted in April to bring back net neutrality. The 3-2 vote was divided along party lines. Broadband providers have since challenged the FCC's action, which is potentially more vulnerable after the Supreme Court's recent decision to strike down Chevron deference -- a legal doctrine that instructed courts to defer to an agency's expert decisions except in a very narrow range of circumstances. Bloomberg Intelligence analyst Matt Schettenhelm said in a report prior to the court's ruling that he doesn't expect the FCC to prevail in court, in large part due to the demise of Chevron. A panel of judges for the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals said in an order that a temporary "administrative stay is warranted" while it considers the merits of the broadband providers' request for a permanent stay. The administrative stay will be in place until August 5th. In the meantime, the court requested the parties provide additional briefs about the application of National Cable & Telecommunications Association v. Brand X Internet Services to this lawsuit.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Russian Boat Implicated in Norway Cable Sabotage Mystery
In a perplexing turn of events that has raised concerns about the vulnerability of critical undersea infrastructure, Norway's Institute of Marine Research is reconfiguring its sophisticated underwater observatory after a mysterious incident left a section of its seafloor cable cleanly severed. The Lofoten-Vesteralen Ocean Observatory (LoVe), an advanced array of sensors designed to monitor marine life and environmental conditions off Norway's rugged coastline, unexpectedly went silent in April 2021, prompting an investigation that would uncover more questions than answers. As the institute's acoustic engineer Guosong Zhang delved into the mystery, he meticulously traced ship movements in the area, uncovering a curious pattern: a Russian trawler had repeatedly crossed the cable's location at the precise time the outage occurred, a coincidence that seemed too striking to ignore. Despite this compelling lead, subsequent police investigations proved inconclusive, leaving the institute grappling with the unsettling possibility of deliberate sabotage. The incident, compounded by similar damage to a communications cable serving the remote Svalbard archipelago, has cast a spotlight on the potential vulnerabilities of submarine assets in an era of heightened geopolitical tensions, with some experts pointing to the possibility of Russian intelligence activities targeting Norway's undersea infrastructure. In response to these challenges and the unresolved nature of the cable damage, the Institute of Marine Research has made the difficult decision to adapt its approach, opting to replace the compromised cable section with wireless modules -- a solution that, while sacrificing some data transmission capacity, aims to enhance the security and resilience of this vital scientific installation in the face of evolving threats beneath the waves.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Weak Security Defaults Enabled Squarespace Domains Hijacks
At least a dozen organizations with domain names at domain registrar Squarespace saw their websites hijacked last week. Krebs on Security: Squarespace bought all assets of Google Domains a year ago, but many customers still haven't set up their new accounts. Experts say malicious hackers learned they could commandeer any migrated Squarespace accounts that hadn't yet been registered, merely by supplying an email address tied to an existing domain. The Squarespace domain hijacks, which took place between July 9 and July 12, appear to have mostly targeted cryptocurrency businesses, including Celer Network, Compound Finance, Pendle Finance, and Unstoppable Domains. In some cases, the attackers were able to redirect the hijacked domains to phishing sites set up to steal visitors' cryptocurrency funds. New York City-based Squarespace purchased roughly 10 million domain names from Google Domains in June 2023, and it has been gradually migrating those domains to its service ever since. Squarespace has not responded to a request for comment, nor has it issued a statement about the attacks. But an analysis released by security experts at Metamask and Paradigm finds the most likely explanation for what happened is that Squarespace assumed all users migrating from Google Domains would select the social login options -- such "Continue with Google" or "Continue with Apple" -- as opposed to the "Continue with email" choice.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Kaspersky Lab Closing US Division, Laying Off Workers After Ban
Russian cybersecurity firm, Kaspersky Lab, has told workers in its U.S.-based division that they are being laid off this week and that it is closing its U.S. business, Zero Day reported Monday, citing sources. From a report: The sudden move comes after the U.S. Commerce Department announced last month that it was banning the sale of Kaspersky software in the U.S. beginning July 20. The company has been selling its software here since 2005. Kaspersky confirmed the news to Zero Day, saying that beginning July 20 it will "gradually wind down" its U.S. operations and eliminate U.S.-based positions as a result of the new ban, despite initially vowing to fight the ban in court.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

Microsoft CTO Says AI Progress Not Slowing Down, It's Just Warming Up
An anonymous reader shares a report: During an interview with Sequoia Capital's Training Data podcast published last Tuesday, Microsoft CTO Kevin Scott doubled down on his belief that so-called large language model (LLM) "scaling laws" will continue to drive AI progress, despite some skepticism in the field that progress has leveled out. Scott played a key role in forging a $13 billion technology-sharing deal between Microsoft and OpenAI. "Despite what other people think, we're not at diminishing marginal returns on scale-up," Scott said. "And I try to help people understand there is an exponential here, and the unfortunate thing is you only get to sample it every couple of years because it just takes a while to build supercomputers and then train models on top of them." LLM scaling laws refer to patterns explored by OpenAI researchers in 2020 showing that the performance of language models tends to improve predictably as the models get larger (more parameters), are trained on more data, and have access to more computational power (compute). The laws suggest that simply scaling up model size and training data can lead to significant improvements in AI capabilities without necessarily requiring fundamental algorithmic breakthroughs. Since then, other researchers have challenged the idea of persisting scaling laws over time, but the concept is still a cornerstone of OpenAI's AI development philosophy.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

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~Created Tue Jul 16 07:27:16 2024

I told you so: Mozilla working with Facebook to weaken Firefox’ privacy and anti-tracking features
I’ve long been warning about the dangers of relying on just one browser as the bullwark against the onslaught of Chrome, Chrome skins, and Safari. With Firefox’ user numbers rapidly declining, now stuck at a mere 2% or so – and even less on mobile – and regulatory pressure possibly ending the Google-Mozilla deal with makes up roughly 80% of Mozilla’s income, I’ve been warning that Mozilla will most likely have to start making Firefox worse to gain more temporary revenue. As the situation possibly grows even more dire, Firefox for Linux would be the first on the chopping block. I’ve received quite a bit of backlash over expressing these worries, but over the course of the last year or so we’ve been seeing my fears slowly become reality before our very eyes, culminating in Mozilla recently acquiring an online advertising analytics company. Over the last few days, things have become even worse: with the release of Firefox 128, the enshitification of Firefox has now well and truly begun. Less than a month after acquiring the AdTech company Anonym, Mozilla has added special software co-authored by Meta and built for the advertising industry directly to the latest release of Firefox, in an experimental trial you have to opt out of manually. This “Privacy-Preserving Attribution” (PPA) API adds another tool to the arsenal of tracking features that advertisers can use, which is thwarted by traditional content blocking extensions. ↫ Jonah Aragon If you have already upgraded to Firefox 128, you have automatically been opted into using this new API, and for now, you can still opt-out by going to Settings > Privacy & Security > Website Advertising Preferences, and remove the checkmark “Allow websites to perform privacy-preserving ad measurement”. You were opted in without your consent, without any widespread announcement, and if it wasn’t for so many Firefox users being on edge about Mozilla’s recent behaviour, it might not have been snuffed out this quickly. Over on GitHub, there’s a more in-depth description of this new API, and the first few words are something you never want to hear from an organisation that claims to fight tracking and protect your privacy: “Mozilla is working with Meta”. I’m not surprised by this at all – like I, perhaps gleefully, pointed out, I’ve been warning about this eventuality for a long time – but I’ve noted that on the wider internet, a lot of people were very much unpleasently surprised, feeling almost betrayed by this, the latest in a series of dubious moves by Mozilla. It’s not even just the fact they’re “working with Meta”, which is entirely disqualifying in and of itself, but also the fact there’s zero transparency or accountability about this new API towards Firefox’ users. Sure, we’re all technologically inclined and follow technology news closely, but the vast majority of people don’t, and there’s bound to be countless people who perhaps only recently moved to Firefox from Chrome for privacy reasons, only to be stabbed in the back by Mozilla partnering up with Facebook, of all companies, if they even find out about this at all. It’s right out of Facebook’s playbook to secretly experiment on users. This is what I wrote a year ago: I’m genuinely worried about the state of browsers on Linux, and the future of Firefox on Linux in particular. I think it’s highly irresponsible of the various prominent players in the desktop Linux community, from GNOME to KDE, from Ubuntu to Fedora, to seemingly have absolutely zero contingency plans for when Firefox enshittifies or dies, despite everything we know about the current state of the browser market, the state of Mozilla’s finances, and the future prospects of both. Desktop Linux has a Firefox problem, but nobody seems willing to acknowledge it. ↫ Thom Holwerda It seems my warnings are turning into reality one by one, and if, at this point, you’re still not worried about where you’re going to go after Firefox starts integrating even more Facebook technologies or Firefox for Linux gets ever more resources pulled away from it until it eventually gets cancelled, you’re blind.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

The AMD Zen 5 microarchitecture: powering Ryzen AI 300 series for mobile and Ryzen 9000 for desktop
Built around the new Zen 5 CPU microarchitecture with some fundamental improvements to both graphics and AI performance, the Ryzen AI 300 series, code-named Strix Point, is set to deliver improvements in several areas. The Ryzen AI 300 series looks set to add another footnote in the march towards the AI PC with its mobile SoC featuring a new XDNA 2 NPU, from which AMD promises 50 TOPS of performance. AMD has also upgraded the integrated graphics with the RDNA 3.5, which is designed to replace the last generation of RDNA 3 mobile graphics, for better performance in games than we’ve seen before. Further to this, during AMD’s recent Tech Day last week, AMD disclosed some of the technical details regarding Zen 5, which also covers a number of key elements under the hood on both the Ryzen AI 300 and the Ryzen 9000 series. On paper, the Zen 5 architecture looks quite a big step up compared to Zen 4, with the key component driving Zen 5 forward through higher instructions per cycle than its predecessor, which is something AMD has managed to do consistently from Zen to Zen 2, Zen 3, Zen 4, and now Zen 5. ↫ Gavin Bonshor at AnandTech Not the review and deep analysis quite yet, but a first thorough look at what Zen 5 is going to bring us, straight from AnandTech.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Fusion OS: writing an OS in Nim
I decided to document my journey of writing an OS in Nim. Why Nim? It’s one of the few languages that allow low-level systems programming with deterministic memory management (garbage collector is optional) with destructors and move semantics. It’s also statically typed, which provides greater type safety. It also supports inline assembly, which is a must for OS development. Other options include C, C++, Rust, and Zig. They’re great languages, but I chose Nim for its simplicity, elegance, and performance. ↫ Fusion OS documentation website I love it when a hobby operating system project not only uses a less common programming language, but the author also details the entire development process in great detail. It’s not a UNIX-like, and the goals are a single 64 bit address space, capability-based security model, and a lot more. It’s targeting UEFI machines, and the code is, of course, open source and available on GitHub.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Google can totally explain why Chromium browsers quietly tell only its websites about your CPU, GPU usage
It’s time for Google being Google, this time by using an undocumented APIs to track resource usage when using Chrome. When visiting a *.google.com domain, the Google site can use the API to query the real-time CPU, GPU, and memory usage of your browser, as well as info about the processor you’re using, so that whatever service is being provided – such as video-conferencing with Google Meet – could, for instance, be optimized and tweaked so that it doesn’t overly tax your computer. The functionality is implemented as an API provided by an extension baked into Chromium – the browser brains primarily developed by Google and used in Chrome, Edge, Opera, Brave, and others. ↫ Brandon Vigliarolo at The Register The original goal of the API was to give Google’s various video chat services – I’ve lost count – the ability to optimise themselves based on the available system resources. Crucially, though, this API is only available to Google’s domains, and other, competing services cannot make use of it. This is in clear violation of the European Union’s Digital Markets Act, and with Chrome being by far the most popular browser in the world, and thus a clear gatekeeper, the European Commission really should have something to say about this. For its part, Google told The Register it claims to comply with the DMA, so we might see a change to this API soon. Aside from optimising video chat performance, the API, which is baked into a non-removable extension, also tracks performance issues and crashes and reports these back to Google. This second use, too, is at its core not a bad thing – especially if users are given the option to opt out of such crash analytics. Still, it seems odd to use an undocumented API for something like this, but I’m not a developer so what do I know. Mind you, other Chromium-based browsers also report this data back to Google, which is wild when you think about it. Normally I would suggest people switch to Firefox, but I’ve got some choice words for Firefox and Mozilla, too, later today.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Pretty pictures, bootable floppy disks, and the first Canon Cat demo?
About a month ago, Cameron Kaiser first introduced us to the Canon Cat, a computer designed by Jeff Raskin, but abandoned within six months by Canon, who had no idea what to do with it. In his second article on the Cat, Kaiser dives much deeper into the software and operating system of the Cat, even going so far as to become the first person to write software for it. One of the most surprising aspects of the Cat is that it’s collaborative; other users can call into your Cat using a landline and edit the same document you’re working on remotely. Selecting text has other functions too. When I say everything goes in the workspace, I do mean everything. The Cat is designed to be collabourative: you can hook up your Cat to a phone line, or at least you could when landlines were more ubiquitous, and someone could call in and literally type into your document remotely. If you dialed up a service, you would type into the document and mark and send text to the remote system, and the remote system’s response would also become part of your document. (That goes for the RS-232 port as well, by the way. In fact, we’ll deliberately exploit this capability for the projects in this article.) ↫ Cameron Kaiser You can also do calculations right into the text, going so far as allowing the user to define variables and reuse those variables throughout the text to perform various equations and other mathematic operations. If you go back and change the value of a variable, all other equations using those variables are updated as well. That’s quite nifty, especially considering the age of the Cat, and since the Cat is fixed width, you can effectively create spreadsheets this way, too. There’s really far too much to cover here, and I strongly suggest you head on over and read the entire thing.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Microsoft quietly updates official lightweight Windows 11 Validation OS ISOs for 24H2
Microsoft has again quietly updated its Validation OS ISOs. In case you are not familiar with it, Validation OS is an official lightweight variant of Windows and it is designed for hardware vendors to test, validate and repair hardware defects. ↫ Sayan Sen at Neowin I had no idea this variant of Windows existed, but it kind of makes sense when you think about it. OEMs or other companies making devices that run or work with Windows may need to test, reboot, test, reboot, and so on, endlessly, and having a lightweight and fast version of Windows that doesn’t load any junk you don’t need – or just loads straight into your company’s hardware testing application – is incredibly valuable. According to Microsoft, the Windows Validation OS boots to a command line that allows you to run Win32 applications. This has made me wonder if I can use it for the one thing I am forced to use Windows for: playing League of Legends (I cobbled together a spare parts machine solely for this purpose). My guess is that either the Validation OS will lack certain components or frameworks League of Legends requires, or is so different from regular Windows that it will trip Riot Games’ rootkit, or both. Still, I’m curious. I might load this up on a spare hard drive and what’s possible.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

GitHub is starting to feel like legacy software
The corporate branding, the new “AI-powered developer platform” slogan, makes it clear that what I think of as “GitHub”—the traditional website, what are to me the core features—simply isn’t Microsoft’s priority at this point in time. I know many talented people at GitHub who care, but the company’s priorities just don’t seem to value what I value about the service. This isn’t an anti-AI statement so much as a recognition that the tool I still need to use every day is past its prime. Copilot isn’t navigating the website for me, replacing my need to the website as it exists today. I’ve had tools hit this phase of decline and turn it around, but I’m not optimistic. It’s still plenty usable now, and probably will be for some years to come, but I’ll want to know what other options I have now rather than when things get worse than this. ↫ Misty De Meo Apparently, GitHub is in the middle of a long, drawn-out process where it’s rewriting its frontend using React. De Meo was trying to use a particular feature of GitHub – the blame view, which also works through the command line but is apparently much harder to parse there – and realised the browser search feature just couldn’t find the line of code they absolutely knew for sure was there. After scrolling for a while, the browser search feature suddenly found the line of code. I’d heard rumblings that GitHub’s in the middle of shipping a frontend rewrite in React, and I realized this must be it. The problem wasn’t that the line I wanted wasn’t on the page—it’s that the whole document wasn’t being rendered at once, so my browser’s builtin search bar just couldn’t find it. On a hunch, I tried disabling JavaScript entirely in the browser, and suddenly it started working again. GitHub is able to send a fully server-side rendered version of the page, which actually works like it should, but doesn’t do so unless JavaScript is completely unavailable. ↫ Misty De Meo Seem like a classic case of people being told to develop something in too little time, with the wrong tools, while management is breathing down their necks and pulling engineers away to work on buzzwords like “AI”.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Windows NT 4.0 ported to run on certain Apple PowerPC Macs
The most fascinating time for Windows NT were its first few years on the market, when the brand new operating system supported a wide variety of architectures, from default x86, all the way down to stuff like Alpha, MIPS, and exotic things like Intel i860, and even weirder stuff like Clipper (even a SPARC port was planned, but never released). One of the more conventional architectures that saw a Windows NT port – one that was actually released to the public, no less – was PowerPC. The last version of Windows NT to support exotic architectures was 4.0, with Windows 2000 only supporting x86, dropping everything else, including PowerPC (although Windows 2000 for Alpha reached RC1 status). The PowerPC version of Windows NT only supported IBM and Motorola systems using the PowerPC Reference Platform, and never the vastly more popular PowerPC systems from Apple. Well, it’s 2024, and that just changed: Windows NT 4.0 can now be installed and run on certain Apple New World Power Macintosh systems. This repository currently contains the source code for the ARC firmware and its loader, targeting New World Power Macintosh systems using the Gossamer architecture (that is, MPC106 “Grackle” memory controller and PCI host, and “Heathrow” or “Paddington” super-I/O chip on the PCI bus). NT4 only, currently. NT 3.51 may become compatible if HAL and drivers get ported to it. NT 3.5 will never be compatible, as it only supports PowerPC 601. (The additional suspend/hibernation features in NT 3.51 PMZ could be made compatible in theory but in practise would require all of the additional drivers for that to be reimplemented.) ↫ maciNTosh GitHub page This is absolutely wild, and one of the most interesting projects I’ve seen in a long, long time. The deeply experimental nature of this effort does mean that NT 4.0 is definitely not stable on any of the currently supported machines, and the number of drivers implemented is the absolute bare minimum to run NT 4.0 on these systems. It does, however, support dual-booting both NT 4.0 and Mac OS8, 9, and X, which would be quite something to set up. I’m not definitely going to keep an eye on eBay for a supported machine, because running NT on anything other than x86 has always been a bit of a weird fascination for me. Sadly, period-correct PowerPC machines that support NT are extremely rare and thus insanely expensive, and will often require board-level repairs that I can’t perform. Getting a more recent Yikes PowerMac G4 should be easy, since those just materialise out of thin air randomly in the world. I’m incredibly excited about this.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Package AmigaOS software for Linux and Windows with AxRuntime
This solution lets developers compile their Amiga API-based applications as Linux binaries. Once the features are implemented, tested and optimized using the runtime on Linux or Windows, developers re-compile their applications for their Amiga-like system of choice and perform final quality checking. Applications created with AxRuntime can be distributed to Linux or Windows communities, giving developers a much broader user base and a possibility to invite developers from outside general Amiga community to contribute to the application. ↫ AxRuntime website I had never considered this as an option, but with AmigaOS 3.x basically being frozen in time, it’s a relatively easy target for an effort such as this. It won’t surprise you to learnt hat AxRuntime is using code from AROS, which itself is fully compatible with AmigaOS 3.1. This should technically mean that any AmigaOS application that runs on AROS should be able to be made to run using this runtime, which is great news for Amiga developers. Why? Well, the cold, harsh truth is that the number of Amiga users is probably still dwindling as the sands of time cause people to, well, die, and the influx of new users, who also happen to possess the skillset to develop AmigaOS software, must be a very, very slow trickle, at best. This runtime will allow AmigaOS developer to package their software to run on Linux and Windows machines, getting a lot more eyes on the software in the process. Amiga devices are not exactly cheap or easy to come by, so this is a great alternative.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Google is ending support for Lacros, the experimental version of Chrome for ChromeOS
Back in August 2023, we previewed our work on an experimental version of Chrome browser for ChromeOS named Lacros. The original intention was to allow Chrome browser on Chromebooks to swiftly get the latest feature and security updates without needing a full OS update. As we refocus our efforts on achieving similar objectives with ChromeOS embracing portions of the Android stack, we have decided to end support for this experiment. We believe this will be a more effective way to help accelerate the pace of innovation on Chromebook. ↫ ChromeOS Beta Tester Community To refresh your memory, Lacros was an attempt by Google to decouple the Chrome browser from ChromeOS itself, so that the browser could be updated indepdnently from ChromeOS as a whole. This would obviously bring quite a few benefits with it, from faster and easier updates, to the ability to keep updating the Chrome browser after device support has ended. This was always an experimental feature, so the end of this experiment really won’t be affecting many people. The interesting part is the reference to the recent announcement that ChromeOS’ Linux kernel and various subsystems will be replaced by their Android counterparts. I’m not entirely sure what this means for the Chrome browser on ChromeOS, since it seems unlikely that they’re going to be using the Android version of Chrome on ChromeOS. It’s generally impossible to read the tea leaves when it comes to whatever Google does, so I’m not even going to try.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Ubuntu security updates are a confusing mess
I’ve read this article several times now, and I’m still not entirely sure how to properly summarise the main points without leaving important details out. If you really boil it down to the very bare essentials, which packages get updates on which Ubuntu release is a confusing mess that most normal users will never be able to understand, potentially leaving them vulnerable to security flaws that have already been widely patched and are available on Ubuntu – just not your specific Ubuntu version, your specific customer type, or the specific package type in question. So, in the case of McPhail here, they needed a patched version of tomcat 9 for Ubuntu 22.04. This patched version was available for Ubuntu 18.04 users because not only is 18.04 an LTS release – meaning five years of support – Canonical also offers a commercial Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) subscription for 18.04, so if you’re paying for that, you get the patched tomcat9. On Ubuntu 20.04, another LTS release, the patched version of tomcat9 is available for everyone, but for the version McPhail is running, the newer LTS release 22.04, it’s only available for Ubuntu Pro subscribers (24.04 is not affected, so not relevant for this discussion). Intuitively, this doesn’t make any sense. The main cause of the weird discrepancy between 20.04 and 22.04 is that Canonical’s LTS support only covers the packages in main (about 10% of the total amount of packages), whereas tomcat9 lives in universe (90% of packages). LTS packages in universe are only supported on a “best effort” basis, and one of the ways a patched universe package can be made available to non-paying LTS users is if it is inhereted from Debian, which happens to be the case for tomcat9 in 20.04, while in 22.04, it’s considered part of an Ubuntu Pro subscription. So, there’s a fixed package, but 22.04 LTS users, who may expect LTS to truly mean LTS, don’t get the patched version that exists and is ready to go without issues. Wild. This is incredibly confusing, and would make me run for the Debian hills before my next reboot. I understand maintaining packages is a difficult, thankless task, but the nebulousness here is entirely of Canonical’s own making, and it’s without a doubt leaving users vulnerable who fully expect to be safe and all patched up because they’re using an LTS release.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Qualcomm’s Oryon core: a long time in the making
In 2019, a startup called Nuvia came out of stealth mode. Nuvia was notable because its leadership included several notable chip architects, including one who used to work for Apple. Apple chips like the M1 drew recognition for landing in the same performance neighborhood as AMD and Intel’s offerings while offering better power efficiency. Nuvia had similar goals, aiming to create a power efficient core that could could surpass designs from AMD, Apple, Arm, and Intel. Qualcomm acquired Nuvia in 2021, bringing its staff into Qualcomm’s internal CPU efforts. Bringing on Nuvia staff rejuvenated Qualcomm’s internal CPU efforts, which led to the Oryon core in Snapdragon X Elite. Oryon arrives nearly five years after Nuvia hit the news, and almost eight years after Qualcomm last released a smartphone SoC with internally designed cores. For people following Nuvia’s developments, it has been a long wait. ↫ Chips and Cheese Now that the Snapdragon X Elite and Pro chips are finally making their way to consumers, we’re also finally starting to see proper deep-dives into the brand new hardware. Considering this will set the standard for ARM laptops for a long time to come – including easy availability of powerful ARM Linux laptops – I really want to know every single quirk or performance statistic we can find.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Iconography of the X Window System: the boot stipple
For the uninitiated, what are we looking at? Could it be the Moiré Error from Doom? Well, no. You are looking at (part of) the boot up screen for the X Window System, specifically the pattern it uses as the background of the root window. This pattern is technically called a stipple. What you’re seeing is pretty important and came to symbolize a lot for me as a computer practitioner. ↫ Matt T. Proud The X bootup pattern is definitely burnt onto my retina, as it probably is for a lot of late ’90s, early 2000s Linux users. Setting up X correctly, and more importantly, not breaking it later, was almost an art at the time, so any time you loaded up your PC and this pattern didn’t greet you, you’d get this sinister feeling in the pit of your stomach. There was now a very real chance you were going to have to debug your X configuration file, and nobody – absolutely nobody – liked doing that, and if you did, you’re lying. Matt T. Proud dove into the history of the X stipple, and discovered it’s been part of X since pretty much the very beginning, and even more esoteric X implementations, like the ones used by Solaris or the various commercial versions, have the stipple. He also discovered several other variants of the stipple included in X, so there is a chance your memory might be just a tiny bit different. The stipple eventually disappeared at around 2008 or so, it disappeared as part of the various efforts to modernise, sanitise, and speed up the Linux boot process on desktops. On modern distributions still using X, you won’t encounter it anymore by default, but in true X fashion, the code is still there and you can easily bring it back using a flag specifically designed for it, -retro, that you can use with startx or your X init file. There’s a ton more information in Proud’s excellent article, but this one paragraph made me smile: I will remark that in spite of my job being a software engineer, I had never spent a lot of time looking at the source code for the X Server (XFree86 or X.Org) before. It’s really nuts to see that a lot of the architecture from X10R3 and X11R1 still persists in the code today, which is a statement that can be said in deep admiration for legacy code but also disturbance from the power of old decisions. Without having looked at the internals of any Wayland implementation, I can sympathize sight unseen with the sentiments that some developers have toward the X Window System: the code is a dead end. I say that with the utmost respect to the X Window System as a technology and an ecosystem. I’ll keep using X, and I will be really sad when it’s no longer possible for me to do so for one reason or another, as I’m extremely attached to it quirks. But it’s clear the future is limited. ↫ Matt T. Proud We all have great – and not so great – memories of X, but I am really, really happy I no longer have to use it.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Palestinians say Microsoft unfairly closing their accounts
Palestinians living abroad have accused Microsoft of closing their email accounts without warning – cutting them off from crucial online services. They say it has left them unable to access bank accounts and job offers – and stopped them using Skype, which Microsoft owns, to contact relatives in war-torn Gaza. Microsoft says they violated its terms of service – a claim they dispute. ↫ Mohamed Shalaby and Joe Tidy at the BBC Checking up on your family members to see if they survived another day of an ongoing genocide doesn’t seem like something that should be violating any terms of any services, but that’s just me.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

“Majority of websites and mobile apps use dark patterns”
A global internet sweep that examined the websites and mobile apps of 642 traders has found that 75,7% of them employed at least one dark pattern, and 66,8% of them employed two or more dark patterns. Dark patterns are defined as practices commonly found in online user interfaces and that steer, deceive, coerce, or manipulate consumers into making choices that often are not in their best interests. ↫ International Consumer Protection and Enforcement Network Dark patterns are everywhere, and it’s virtually impossible to browse the web, use certain types of services, or install mobile applications, without having to dodge and roll just to avoid all kinds of nonsense being thrown at you. It’s often not even ads that make the web unusable – it’s all the dark patterns tricking you into viewing ads, entering into a subscription, enabling notifications, sharing your email address or whatever, that’s the real reason. This is why one of the absolute primary demands I have for the next version of OSNews is zero dark patterns. I don’t want any dialogs begging you to enable ads, no modal windows demanding you sign up for a newsletter, no popups asking you to enable notifications, and so on – none of that stuff. My golden standard is “your computer, your rules”, and that includes your right to use ad blockers or anything else to change the appearance or functioning of our website on your computer. It’d be great if dark patterns became illegal somehow, but it would be incredibly difficult to write any legislation that would properly cover these practices.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

AmigaKit launches a new Amiga that’s not an Amiga at all
I try to keep tabs on a huge number of operating system projects out there – for obvious reasons – but long ago I learned that when it comes to the world of Amiga, it’s best to maintain distance and let any important news find its way out of the Amiga bubble, lest one loses their sanity. Keeping up with the Amiga world requires following every nook and cranny of various forums and websites with different allegiances to different (shell) companies, with often barely coherent screeching and arguments literally nobody cares about. It’s a mess is what I’m trying to say. Anyway, it seems one of the many small companies still somehow making a living in the Amiga world, AmigaKit, has recently released a new device, the A600GS. It’s a retrogaming-oriented Amiga computer, but it does come with something called AmiBench, that’s apparently a weird hybrid between bits of Amiga OS 4 and AROS, so it does also support running a proper desktop and associated applications, but only AmigaOS 3.x applications (I think? It’s a bit unclear). It has HDMI at up to 1080p, and even WiFi and Bluetooth support, which is pretty neat. Wait, Wifi and Bluetooth support? What are we really dealing with here? Once again the information is hard to find because AmigaKit is incredibly stingy with specifications – I had to read goddamn YouTube comments to get some hints – but it seems to be a custom board with an Orange Pi Zero 3 stuck on top doing most of the work. In other words, the meat of this thing is just an emulator, which in and of itself isn’t a bad thing, it’s just weird to me that they’re not upfront and direct about this. While this answers some questions, it also raises a whole bunch more. If this is running on low-end Allwinner ARM hardware from 2022, how is this AmiBench desktop environment (or operating system?) a “fork of OS4 with AROS code in it“? AmigaOS 4 is PowerPC-only, which may explain why AmigaKit only mentions AmigaOS 3.x and 68K compatibility, and not AmigaOS 4 compatibility. And what’s AROS doing in there? I mean, this is an interesting product in the sense that it’s a relatively cheap turnkey solution for classic Amiga enthusiasts, but a new Amiga this is definitely not. At about €130, this is not a bad deal, but other than hardcore fans of the classic 68K Amiga, I don’t see many people being interested in this. The Apollo Standalone V4+ piques my interest way more, but at €700-800, it’s also a lot more expensive, but at least they’re much clearer about what the Apollo is, what software it’s running, and that they’re giving back their work to AROS.
OSnews ~Created Tue Jul 16 06:06:13 2024

Silicon Valley's trial of the century
A look at the Theranos trial and the evidence that led to Elizabeth Holmes being found guilty of fraud.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Asus recalls product after users 'smell smoke'
The computer company has had a "few" complaints and warned some 2021 models could be affected.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Elizabeth Holmes: Theranos founder convicted of fraud
The Silicon Valley ex-CEO faces a lengthy term in prison for defrauding investors.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Why BlackBerry held the tiny keys to my heart
The classic smartphone's life comes to an end on 4 January as the firm switches off support.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Elon Musk: Tesla criticised after opening Xinjiang showroom
The world's most valuable car maker opened the new showroom in the city of Urumqi on New Year's Eve.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Apple becomes first firm to hit $3tn market value
The firm's value more than doubled during the pandemic as people bought more gadgets during lockdowns.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Top US phone firms agree delay of 5G rollout
The two-week delay requested by transportation and aviation authorities was initially rejected.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Is there a better way to make new resolutions stick?
There are lots of apps that promise to make you healthier and happier but are they any good?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Marjorie Taylor Greene: Twitter bans congresswoman over Covid misinformation
The congresswoman was suspended after tweeting falsely about high levels of vaccine related deaths.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Milton Keynes to hold large-scale driverless car trial
The council believes driverless vehicles could be commonplace in the town within two years.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Year in tech: The stories making headlines in 2021
From the metaverse to NFTs and everything in-between, what's made the news in tech this year?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

NHS Covid app sends record number of 'pings'
The alerts ask people to test or self-isolate after contact with someone who had a positive result.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Can fitness apps be as effective as a personal trainer?
A growing number of fitness apps use artificial intelligence software to personalise workouts.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Tesla to recall 475,000 cars in the US
The number of cars being recalled is nearly equivalent to the firm's global deliveries last year.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

China ride-hailing giant Didi sees losses deepen after crackdown
This month the company announced that it would move its share listing from New York to Hong Kong.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

TikTok moderator sues over 'psychological trauma'
Candie Frazier says her mental health suffered after watching "extreme and graphic" video content.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Elon Musk rejects claims that his satellites are hogging space
His comments come after China complained to the United Nations about his internet satellite project.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

What is artificial intelligence and why is it important?
Many recent big advances in tech have one key thing at the heart of then: artificial intelligence.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

What are algorithms and how do they work?
A huge amount of our lives is influenced by algorithms. Here's how they work.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

What are quantum computers and what are they used for?
Companies around the world are racing to create a new generation of computers.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

How do you turn off the internet?
How easy would it be for a government to block one of the biggest sources of news and information?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Bitcoin: What are crypto-currencies?
Fans of crypto-currencies say they are the future of money - but at what cost?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

The rise and fall of Elizabeth Holmes
The founder of the once promising start-up Theranos has been found guilty of fraud. What went wrong?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Games to look out for in 2022
The BBC's gaming reporter Steffan Powell runs through what to look out for over the coming year.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

What is the metaverse?
From virtual versions of ourselves to augmented reality, we break down what the metaverse is.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

How to read your weather app
What you need to know about weather forecasts on your phone
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Virtual reality worship: What carols at home looks like this Christmas
The Church of England has released a series of virtual reality carols
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Elizabeth Holmes: Has the Theranos scandal changed Silicon Valley?
Could a Theranos scandal happen again or has Silicon Valley learnt its lesson?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Miners experiment with hydrogen to power giant trucks
Anglo American is testing a hydrogen-powered giant truck in a bid to make its business greener.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

The robot chefs that can cook your Christmas dinner
If you fancy not having to do the cooking on 25 December then a robotic chef might be the solution.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Tech trends 2022: Starships and missing chips
From giant rockets to new ways to heat your home, a look at the technology that will emerge in 2022.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

How Russia tries to censor Western social media
Western social media companies face huge fines as Russia pressures them to remove content it objects to.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Console shortages: Why can't I buy the Xbox Series X or PlayStation 5?
Chinese power cuts, the pandemic and other reasons you can't get your hands on gaming hardware.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

How vending machines are making life better for Kenyans
By thinking small vending machine firms are delivering more affordable products for Kenyan shoppers.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Webcast: Navigating QuickBooks 2013 - Mar 19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Katie Cunningham Lynn Root at Let's Learn Python at PyCon - Mar 13-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Being Productive with Windows 8 - Mar 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

O'Reilly Strata Conference - Feb 26-28 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Hybrid Apps with PhoneGap - Feb 21 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Rich, High Performance Tools for Practical Data Analysis - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Thinking Big Together: Driving the Future of Data Science - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Christopher Schmitt at In Control Orlando 2013 Mobile and Web Design Conference - Feb 17-19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing for Data-driven Organizations - Feb 14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Tools of Change for Publishing Conference (TOC) - Feb 12-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: How Lean Startups Define, Measure, and Communicate Progress - Feb 8 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Using Windows XP in a Windows 8 Virtual Machine - Feb 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Bandit Algorithms for the Web - Feb 5 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: UX Design for Digital Books: Creating Engaging Digital Reading Experiences - Feb 1 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing And Creating A Social Book App Using Open-source Technologies - Jan 29 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Core Data

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

EPUB 3 Best Practices

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Windows Server 2012 Inside Out

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Secrets of Product Management - Jan 24 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: So you got a Raspberry Pi for the Holidays - Jan 23 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Data Warfare - Jan 22 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: 10 Steps to Product/Market Fit - Jan 18 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Principles of Mobile Interface Design - Jan 17 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

The Book of GIMP

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: HTML5 for Mobile Devices - Jan 16 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

NewsBone.com
Suggest a feed to syndicate here, or check out what I'm doing over at freshtao.
~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Securing the Black Hat Wi-Fi Network With Aruba's Cloud
Aruba uses new technology to minimize the on-site equipment needed to secure one of the most hostile conference environments in America.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Is Cisco's WPA Migration Mode Leaving Wi-Fi Users at Risk?
Researchers at Black Hat this week warn about a potential threat in Cisco 1200-series wireless access points, but the enterprise networking giant downplays the danger.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Intel Denies Any Reduction in WiMAX Commitment
The chip giant was forced to respond after Asian publication reported the dissolution of Intel's WiMAX promotional group.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Aerohive Revamps Free Online Wi-Fi Planner
With an update to its Wi-Fi planning tool, Aerohive has made it easier for networkers to plan for Wi-Fi deployments. Enterprise Networking Planet's review of the revamped tool says improved report output, a streamlined workflow and better interface make the tool accessible to more people while providing better results.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Meru Expands WLAN Service Assurance Portfolio
Spectrum analysis, security, and monitoring products increase reliability and cut TCO for Meru Virtual Cell WLANs.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Veriwave's WaveDeploy Raises the Bar on WLAN Assessment
Site assessment tool maps per-client application performance for what-if analysis, client certification, and SLA validation.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Google Apologizes for Snaring Wi-Fi Data
Google says it didn't mean to gather unsecured data as its cars roamed the streets putting together Street View images, but the search company learned it was doing just that as a result of a request for an audit from a German privacy authority.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

4G On the Brink of Massive Growth
Whether it's WiMAX or LTE, 4G is going to be growing in the next few years. While the two protocols coexist right now, what's the future going to hold?
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

SiBeam Introduces Wireless Video Streaming Chipset
By combining support two high-speed wireless protocols, the company hopes to usher in new, cheaper forms of high-definition wireless streaming.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Wi-Fi 2015: Where Is Wireless Networking Going?
With more than 1 billion devices on the market and 802.11n now standardized, what's next for the networking technology? A panel of networking experts at Interop peers into the crystal ball.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

FCC chief set for panto horse net neutrality settlement
Oh no he isn't
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Outlook for Mac update arrives with new Word and Excel apps coming next year
But Microsoft recommends deleting Office for Mac 2011 before using it
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Facebook takes to Tor for weird sort of anonymous socialising
It's anonymous, but everyone can see it and it's a bit weird
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Hungary scraps internet tax plans in wake of mass protests
Neelie Kroes welcomes the decision
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm sentenced for CSC hack
Three and a half years for computer hacking
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Amazon beats off Apple in US tablet satisfaction standings
That's one in the i for the handheld market
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Nexus 6 destined to flop owing to high price and pre-order disaster
Google demonstrates how not to release a smartphone
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Drupal flaw could hit millions of sites
Users of web content management system urged to close backdoor access
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

China will move to Linux by 2020 in 'de-Windowsifying' process
Chinese government advisor invents new word
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

iPhone 6 Plus review
Phablet is a welcome addition to Apple smartphone range
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Yosemite users reporting problems with WiFi connectivity
Others bemoan Bluetooth and Handoff issues
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Sony posts huge Q3 loss as smartphone sales continue to slide
But PS4 sales are on the up
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Google must pay Canadian woman over Street View cleavage boobie
Dcolletage will not help anyone find their way anywhere
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Intel settlement means cheap round for anyone who bought Pentium 4 processor
Offer also open to liars. But not Illinois residents.
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Best travel gadgets 2014
A rundown of this year's must-have gizmos for commuters and jetsetters
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung Galaxy A5 and A3 arrive with metal bodies and Android 4.4 Kitkat
Mid-range smartphones look to sway buyers away from the iPhone 6
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

LG Display develops 'world's narrowest' smartphone bezel at 0.7mm
Features on a 5.3in Full HD LCD smartphone panel
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Android Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Andy Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Windows 7 OEM licence availability reaches zero day
From today, it's 8 or 0
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Microsoft Band vs FitBit Charge HR specs comparison
We pit the two latest fitness tracking wearables head to head
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay's Svartholm found guilty in Danish hacking case
Jury rejects remote access plea
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Liberty exposes secret links between GCHQ and the NSA
Papers prove private access deal
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung closes in on Apple's iPad with 18.3 percent of global tablet market
Firm sees a 5.6 percent rise in sales in the third quarter
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Material makeover meets many Android apps as Lollipop launch looms
Plus new Bookmark Manager, and Google Now knows your bank balance
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

NewsBone.com
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~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

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