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10-year-old Sudo Bug Lets Linux Users Gain Root-Level Access
A major vulnerability impacting a large chunk of the Linux ecosystem has been patched today in Sudo, an app that allows admins to delegate limited root access to other users. From a report: The vulnerability, which received a CVE identifier of CVE-2021-3156, but is more commonly known as "Baron Samedit," was discovered by security auditing firm Qualys two weeks ago and was patched earlier today with the release of Sudo v1.9.5p2. In a simple explanation provided by the Sudo team today, the Baron Samedit bug can be exploited by an attacker who has gained access to a low-privileged account to gain root access, even if the account isn't listed in /etc/sudoers -- a config file that controls which users are allowed access to su or sudo commands in the first place.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Nintendo Sued by European Gamers Hampered by Broken Controllers
Nintendo faces a complaint from BEUC, a European consumer group, over what it calls "systematic problems" with the controllers for the company's popular Switch games console. BEUC said it filed a complaint with the European Union and national consumer protection organizations after evidence from users showed that in 88% of cases, "the game controllers broke within the first two years." A report adds: The group said some 25,000 gamers and other consumers across Europe, including France, Belgium and the Netherlands, complained about a "recurring technical problem with Nintendo Switch controllers, commonly referred to as 'Joy-Con Drift,' according to a statement on Wednesday. The problem causes a glitch where characters can move within games without any input from the user.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Social Media Damages Teenagers' Mental Health, Report Says
Teenagers' mental health is being damaged by heavy social media use, a report has found. From a report: Research from the Education Policy Institute and The Prince's Trust said wellbeing and self-esteem were similar in all children of primary school age. Boys and girls' wellbeing is affected at the age of 14, but girls' mental health drops more after that, it found. A lack of exercise is another contributing factor - exacerbated by the pandemic, the study said. According to the research: One in three girls was unhappy with their personal appearance by the age of 14, compared with one in seven at the end of primary school. The number of young people with probable mental illness has risen to one in six, up from one in nine in 2017. Boys in the bottom set at primary school had lower self-esteem at 14 than their peers. The wellbeing of both genders fell during adolescence, with girls experiencing a greater decline, the report said.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Google Spells Out Consequences of Apple's Privacy Push and IDFA Changes
Apple has prioritized user privacy over targeted advertising, and Google is spelling out today what that means for itself as well as game and app developers. From a report: Apple is advocating its App Tracking Transparency (ATT) policy, which will require developers to ask for permission when they use personal data from other companies' apps and websites for advertising purposes, even if they already have user consent. It will ask users to opt-in if they will allow advertisers to use their data via the Identifier for Advertisers, or IDFA. Many tests show that many users won't allow it, and that means they won't be so easily tracked for advertising purposes. This change could have a huge impact on the mobile advertising ecosystem, as it could make it harder to target users efficiently with advertising. Eric Seufert, a user acquisition expert, said on Monday that he believes that Facebook could suffer a 7% revenue hit -- a loss of tens of billions of dollars over time -- as a result of the IDFA changes, and it's no secret that Facebook isn't happy about the impact on itself as well as small businesses. At our Driving Game Growth event on Tuesday, Facebook leaders pointed to the IDFA changes as creating uncertainty for mobile games in 2021. Google, which could also be impacted by the policy change, has stayed out of the fray -- until today. "Today we're sharing how Google is helping our community prepare, as we know that developers and advertisers in the iOS ecosystem are still figuring out how to adapt," said Christophe Combette, group product manager for Google Ads in a blog post.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

TiVo Says People Want Ads
If the folks who are responsible for beaming content to your eyeballs are to be believed, streamers are thirsty for more ads of all things. From a report: A survey of 4,526 adults in the U.S. and Canada published by TiVo today claims that a whopping 79% of the survey's respondents reported wanting to use a free and ad-supported service rather than pay for another one. While 81% said they wished Prime Video and Netflix offered free tiers with ads, 80% of respondents reported a difference in the quality of the content on many free, ad-supported platforms -- more specifically, that it's worse. That is, for the most part, true, an exception maybe being Peacock (if you really like NBC). On services like IMDb TV and Vudu, for example, you typically have to comb through a lot of so-so content to find something recent and decent to watch. A bunch of premium services like Hulu and CBS All Access do offer cheaper, ad-supported versions of their products, but those still both cost a few bucks a month for access.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

TikTok To Shed Hundreds of India Workers After National Security Ban
TikTok has announced that it will lay off hundreds of workers in India, [Editor's note: the link may be paywalled; alternative source] seven months after the Chinese-owned video app was banned from what was once its biggest international market on national security grounds. From a report: The company, whose parent is Chinese tech group ByteDance, said in a statement on Wednesday that it would reduce its current headcount of 2,000 after its efforts to restore the app in India failed. "We have not been given a clear direction on how and when our apps could be reinstated," said TikTok. TikTok and other Chinese apps have been banned since June following a rise in tensions between New Delhi and Beijing.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

AMC Spikes 260% as Day Traders Ignite Shorted Stocks like GameStop, BlackBerry, and Bed Bath & Beyond
AMC shares skyrocketed as much as 260% in premarket trading on Wednesday as day traders piled into heavily shorted stocks for a third consecutive day. From a report: Frenzied buying also drove GameStop shares up as much as 147%, BlackBerry up 31%, and Bed Bath & Beyond up 27%. Amateur investors have gathered, most notably on Reddit forum r/wallstreet bets, to pinpoint stocks they can buy en masse and score fast profits. They frequently target stocks that are popular shorts, as driving their stock prices up can pressure short-sellers into buying shares back to cover their positions, which sends prices even higher. Day traders also see the strategy as a way to stick it to Wall Street. They have targeted hedge funds such as Melvin Capital, which had negative positions in 17 US-listed stocks at the last count. Four of those - GameStop, Bed Bath & Beyond, Dillard's, and Ligand Pharmaceuticals - jumped at least 10% in premarket trading on Wednesday.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Just 1 In 10 Companies Expect All Employees To Return To the Office
An anonymous reader writes: Only about 1 in 10 companies expect all employees to return to their pre-pandemic work arrangements, according to a new survey. The National Association for Business Economics found that just 11 percent of survey respondents expect all staff members at their companies to return eventually. Around 65 percent of companies have allowed "most" or "all" of their staff members to work from home during the pandemic, and about half of respondents said they plan to continue the policies until the second half of the year. "For the most part, companies that are able to provide work-from-home are doing so and are continuing to do so," said Andrew Challenger, vice president of the executive outplacement and coaching firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Challenger said his conversations with human resources executives indicated a reluctance to mandate a return to the office while the virus is still circulating and parts of the country face surges. In some cases, local or state lockdowns, school and day care closings or restrictions on building capacities also limit employers' options. According to another recent survey, 31% of professionals from 42 tech companies said they're only putting in between three and four hours a day. However, the survey did not ask the workers to self-report productivity.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Google Maps Will Soon Show COVID Vaccine Locations
New submitter wooloohoo shares a report from Ars Technica: The rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine means a ton of people are soon going to be looking for vaccination sites. As usual, Google wants to be at the center of getting people where they're going, and in a new blog post Google says it will start loading Search and Maps with information on vaccination sites. "In the coming weeks," the company writes, "COVID-19 vaccination locations will be available in Google Search and Maps, starting with Arizona, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas, with more states and countries to come." Soon you'll be able to search "COVID vaccine" and get location results showing access requirements, appointment information, and if a site has a drive-through. Google says it is partnering with the Boston Children's Hospital's VaccineFinder.org, government agencies, and retail pharmacies for the data. Elsewhere in the Google Empire, the company says it will open up various Google facilities as vaccine sites. "Google also says it plans on launching a 'Get the Facts' campaign across its services," the report adds. "The post says the initiative will run across Google and YouTube to 'get authoritative information out to the public about vaccines.'"
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Axiom Names First Private Crew Paying $55 Million For a Trip To the ISS
An American real estate investor, a Canadian investor, and a former Israeli Air Force pilot are paying $55 million each to be part of the first fully private astronaut crew to journey to the International Space Station. The Verge reports: The trio will hitch a ride on SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule early next year, with a veteran NASA astronaut as the commander. The Ax-1 mission, arranged by Houston, Texas-based space tourism company Axiom Space, is a watershed moment for the space industry as companies race to make space travel more accessible to private customers instead of governments. Private citizens have trekked to the space station in the past, but the Ax-1 mission marks the first to use a commercially built astronaut capsule: SpaceX's Crew Dragon, which flew its first two crews to the ISS last year. Larry Connor, an entrepreneur and nonprofit activist investor; Mark Pathy, the Canadian investor and philanthropist; and Eytan Stibbe, the former Israeli fighter pilot and an impact investor, were revealed by Axiom on Tuesday morning as the company's inaugural crew. Connor, 71, is president of The Connor Group, a luxury real estate investment firm based in Ohio. He'd become the second-oldest person to fly to space after John Glenn, who flew the US space shuttle Discovery at 77 years old. The crew's flight to the space station, an orbital laboratory some 250 miles above Earth, will take two days. They'll then spend about eight days aboard the station's US segment, where they'll take part "in research and philanthropic projects," Axiom said in a statement. Living alongside working astronauts from the US, Russia, and likely Germany, the private crew members will roll out sleeping bags somewhere on the station. [...] The Ax-1 mission will have to be approved by the Multilateral Crew Operations Panel, the space station's managing body of partner countries that includes the US, Russia, Canada, Japan, and others. That approval process kicked off today...
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Substance Found In Antarctic Ice May Solve a Martian Mystery
sciencehabit shares a report from Science Magazine: Researchers have discovered a common martian mineral deep within an ice core from Antarctica. The find suggests the mineral -- a brittle, yellow-brown substance known as jarosite -- was forged the same way on both Earth and Mars: from dust trapped within ancient ice deposits. It also reveals how important these glaciers were on the Red Planet: Not only did they carve valleys, the researchers say, but they also helped create the very stuff Mars is made of. Jarosite was first spotted on Mars in 2004, when the NASA Opportunity rover rolled over fine-grained layers of it. The discovery made headlines because jarosite needs water to form, along with iron, sulfate, potassium, and acidic conditions. The work suggests jarosite forms the same way on Mars, says Megan Elwood Madden, a geochemist at the University of Oklahoma who was not involved with the research. But she wonders whether the process can explain the huge abundance of jarosite on Mars. "On Mars, this is not just some thin film," she says. "These are meters-thick deposits." [Giovanni Baccolo, a geologist at the University of Milan-Bicocca] concedes that the ice core contained only small amounts of jarosite, particles smaller than an eyelash or a grain of sand. But he explains that there's much more dust on Mars than in Antarctica, which only receives small amounts of airborne ash and dirt from northern continents. "Mars is such a dusty place -- everything is covered in dust," Baccolo says. More ash would favor more jarosite formation under the right conditions, he says. Baccolo wants to use Antarctic cores to investigate whether ancient martian ice deposits were cauldrons for the formation of other minerals. He says jarosite shows how glaciers weren't just land carving machines, but might have contributed to Mars's chemical makeup. "This is just the first step in linking deep Antarctic ice with the martian environment." The researchers reported their findings this month in Nature Communications.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Chrome OS 88 Turns Your Chromebook Into An Impromptu Smart Display
Google has started rolling out Chrome OS 88. The update includes a couple of enhancements, the most notable of which is a new screen saver you can use to get more functionality out of your computer's lock screen. Engadget reports: By enabling the feature, your Chromebook will be able to display images from your Google Photos library, including those you've organized into specific albums. You can also choose from a selection of default images put together by Google. If you use the Google Photos functionality built into the Pixel Stand and Nest Hub, you'll have a good idea of how the screen saver works. The lock screen also displays the time and local weather and provides you with easy to access media controls so you can pause or play a song. You'll find your WiFi and battery status on the bottom right corner and the option to sign out from your account if you want. You enable the feature by digging into the settings menu of Chrome OS and finding your way to the Personalization section. Once enabled, it will turn on when the operating system detects that your device has been idle for some time. The update also introduces a feature that allows you to use your pin or fingerprint, instead of a password, to log into websites that support the WebAuthn standard.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

One-Third of Tech Workers Admit To Working Only 3 To 4 Hours a Day, Report Finds
According to a survey by Blind, 31% of professionals from 42 tech companies said they're only putting in between three and four hours a day. Fast Company reports: Additionally, the survey found, 27% of tech professionals said they work five to six hours a day, and 11% reported only working one to two hours per day. In contrast, 30% said they work between seven and 10 hours per day. The survey did not ask the workers to self-report productivity, which we know is very different for everyone. Although the responses within the companies surveyed were anecdotal, one Amazon employee commented, "Amazon requires at least 10 hours a day, with exceptions and maybe less work on Fridays or more work on weekends. I'm working way more during COVID-19, calendar's full back to back, leadership is asking for more." Meanwhile, a professional at Facebook reported, "If meetings count then 9-10. If they do not... [less than] 1," bearing out the fact that the pandemic has not impacted everyone equally.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

Biden's Commerce Nominee Backs Changes To Section 230
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: In a hearing on her nomination for Commerce Department secretary on Tuesday, Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo told lawmakers that she will pursue changes to Section 230 if confirmed. Responding to questions posed by Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI), Raimondo said that she would use the tools available through the Commerce Department's National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) to convene stakeholders, industry leaders, lawmakers and others to identify the means of reform to the pivotal internet law. "I think platform accountability is important because I've seen in my own state that misinformation hurts people," Raimondo said. "But of course, that reform would have to be balanced against the fact that these businesses rely upon user-generated content for their innovation, and they've created many thousands of jobs." [...] It's unclear how the Biden administration plans to address Section 230 concerns, but Raimondo's comments offer some insight into what could come in the future. In an interview with The New York Times last year, Biden said that the law should be "revoked." Once Trump signed his social media order, a Biden campaign spokesperson told The Verge that he still wanted to repeal the law but disagreed with the former president's executive order. When it comes to addressing monopoly power in the tech industry, Raimondo said she would leave those decisions up to Congress and the Federal Trade Commission. Still, Raimondo told Johnson, "I believe in competition and innovation and as it relates to social media companies, I think they need to be held accountable for what they put on their platform. "We have to hold these companies accountable," Raimondo said.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 30-Series Laptops Put To the Test
MojoKid writes: This morning, NVIDIA lifted its embargo on the performance and experiences of new GeForce RTX 30 Series-powered gaming laptops. Thinner, higher-performance form factors aren't the only features NVIDIA is touting with this launch. A number of new laptops will also sport 1440p, high refresh rate IPS displays like the MSI GS66 Stealth with a GeForce RTX 3080 mobile GPU tested at HotHardware. This machine features a 15.6-inch IPS, 1440p panel with a 240Hz refresh rate and G-Sync support. However, the biggest difference between these new laptop GeForce RTX 30 series GPUs and their desktop counterparts, are their core counts. Desktop GeForce RTX 3080, 3070, and 3060 series GPUs have 8,704, 5,888, and 3,584 CUDA cores, respectively, whereas these new laptop offerings have 6,144, 5,120, and 3,840 -- it is only the RTX 3060 laptop GPU that has more cores than its similar-branded desktop counterpart. In the benchmarks, with a retail-ready Alienware m15 R4 gaming laptop powered by a GeForce RTX 3070 mobile GPU, the new platform offered sizable performance gains of 15-25% over the previous generation RTX 20 series mobile offering, and an even stronger performance lift with ray tracing enabled, sometimes in excess of 40%. NVIDIA GeForce 30 Series laptops are in production now and available in the next few weeks from major OEMs like Alienware, ASUS, MSI, Gigabyte and others.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

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~Created Wed Jan 27 13:27:19 2021

What color was “Apple Beige”?
Apple’s second computer — its first to have a case — launched in 1977, and that boxy beige Apple II was soon everywhere: in classrooms, living rooms and offices. At the vanguard of a generation of personal computers to come, it featured a particular and carefully-chosen beige. But what did that look like? Those first machines — the ones that have escaped landfills anyway — have shifted in color over 40 years. The documented public record is sketchy and confused. But I stumbled upon a way to investigate what Apple Beige was like. Fascinating bit of sleuthing, and a fun read to boot. Maybe not the most important aspect of computer history, but every bit of information we can preserve is worth it.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

AMD Ryzen 9 5980HS Cezanne review: Ryzen 5000 Mobile tested
For our benchmark suite, almost all of our benchmarks show an uplift for the new Ryzen 5000 Mobile series, some considerably so: our compile benchmark is +12%, Corona rendering is +18%, Dolphin emulation +17%, NAMD +8%, Blender +6%. To our surprise our SPEC2006 1T benchmark is +32%, accelerated considerably by the 16 MB L3 cache, but also because these CPUs also support a higher instantaneous power turbo modes than the previous generation. This enables some competitive performance numbers against Intel’s Tiger Lake platform in single thread focused tests (AMD wins on multithread quite easily). AnandTech with the only deep dive that really matters.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Limine and TomatBoot
As I was browsing back and forth around the website for skiftOS yesterday, I came across two more interesting related projects – two bootloaders with very specific goals. First, Limine: Limine is an advanced x86/x86_64 BIOS Bootloader that supports modern PC features such as Long Mode, 5-level paging, multi-core startup, and more thanks to the stivale and stivale2 boot protocols. Second, since Limine does not support EUFI, they mention TomatBoot, which uses the same boot protocols but in an EUFI environment: TomatBoot is a simple kernel loader for 64bit UEFI based systems. The gold of this bootloader is to serve as an example of how to create UEFI applications, we use the edk2 headers/libraries without the edk2 buildsystem for simplicity.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

skiftOS: a hobby operating system
skiftOS is a hobby operating system built for learning and for fun targeting the x86 platform. It features a kernel named hjert, a graphical user interface with a compositing window manager, and familiar UNIX utilities. This looks remarkably advanced for a “hobby operating system”, and can be run in both Qemu and VirtualBox. This one is definitely worth a virtual boot. The code is licensed under the MIT license and available on GitHub.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Remembering Windows 3.1 themes and user empowerment
The rise of OSX (remember, when it came along Apple had a single-digit slice of the computer market) meant that people eventually got used to the idea of a life with no desktop personalization. Nowadays most people don’t even change their wallpapers anymore. In the old days of Windows 3.1, it was common to walk into an office and see each person’s desktop colors, fonts and wallpapers tuned to their personalities, just like their physical desk, with one’s family portrait or plants. It’s a big loss. Android and Linux desktops still offer massive amounts of personalisation options – thank god – but the the other major platforms have all individuality stamped out of them. It’s boring.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Google cuts Chromium off from sync features and Google APIs
Google has announced that it is cutting off access to the Sync and “other Google Exclusive” APIs from all builds except Google Chrome. This will make the Fedora Chromium build significantly less functional (along with every other distro packaged Chromium). It is noteworthy that Google gave the builders of distribution Chromium packages these access rights back in 2013 via API keys, specifically so that we could have open source builds of Chromium with (near) feature parity to Chrome. And now they’re taking it away. The reasoning given for this change? Google does not want users to be able to “access their personal Chrome Sync data (such as bookmarks) … with a non-Google, Chromium-based browser.” They’re not closing a security hole, they’re just requiring that everyone use Chrome. Or to put it bluntly, they do not want you to access their Google API functionality without using proprietary software (Google Chrome). There is no good reason for Google to do this, other than to force people to use Chrome. This is what we in the business call a “dick move”.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Making Win32 APIs more accessible to more languages
Win32 APIs provide powerful functionality that let you get the most out of Windows in your applications. While these APIs are readily accessible to C and C++ developers, other languages like C# and Rust require wrappers or bindings in order to access these APIs. In C#, this is commonly known as platform invoking or P/Invoke. Historically this has required developers to handcraft the wrappers or bindings, which is error prone and doesn’t scale to broad API coverage. In recent years, given the strong demand for calling Win32 APIs from various languages, several community projects have spawned to provide more strongly typed and idiomatic representations of these wrappers and bindings to provide an improved developer experience and spare developers the overhead of creating them themselves. Some notable projects include PInvoke for .NET and winapi-rs for Rust. The main challenge with these projects is they are manually maintained, which makes broad and sustained API coverage difficult and costly, and their work doesn’t really benefit other languages. As owners of the Windows SDK, we wanted to see where we could provide unique value here, take some of the burden off of the community, and make achieving broad and sustainable API coverage across languages a reality. The result of this is our win32metadata project and corresponding Win32 language projections now in preview on GitHub! I’m not a developer, but I think this means that Microsoft is trying to make it easier to tap into the Win32 API with languages other than C and C++. This seems like a smart move considering how popular some of these more modern and/or recent languages have become. It also highlights that despite repeated attempts to kill Win32, Microsoft seems to have accepted that it simply isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

How we ported Linux to the M1
It also made Apple silicon rather distinct from all other 64-bit ARM hardware in terms of both CPU core and peripherals. Our Corellium virtualization platform has been providing security researchers with unparalleled insight into how operating systems and programs work on Apple ARM processors. But in the process of developing our virtualization system, we also gain knowledge about the hardware we are modeling, and this knowledge can be best refined by testing it against real hardware – which we have only been able to do with the emergence of checkm8, an exploit that let us load programs onto Apple smartphones. This led directly to the Sandcastle project, where we built a kernel port to the A10 processor in early 2020. So when Apple decided to allow installing custom kernels on the Macs with M1 processor, we were very happy to try building another Linux port to further our understanding of the hardware platform. As we were creating a model of the processor for our security research product, we were working on the Linux port in parallel. Excellent work by Corellium, and this materialised a lot faster than I anticipated. This makes M1-equipped Macs potentially more useful than if they could only run macOS, but of course, as with all these closed platforms and Linux support, the devil is in the details – bringing up a Linux kernel is only the first step – a big and crucial one, but only the first.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Porting Firefox to Apple Silicon
The release of Apple Silicon-based Macs at the end of last year generated a flurry of news coverage and some surprises at the machine’s performance. This post details some background information on the experience of porting Firefox to run natively on these CPUs. We’ll start with some background on the Mac transition and give an overview of Firefox internals that needed to know about the new architecture, before moving on to the concept of Universal Binaries. We’ll then explain how DRM/EME works on the new platform, talk about our experience with macOS Big Sur, and discuss various updater problems we had to deal with. We’ll conclude with the release and an overview of various other improvements that are in the pipeline. These kinds of articles are very valuable, since Apple isn’t always forthcoming with documentation of specifications, and the new M1-based Macs are no exception. Big, massive projects like Firefox sharing their experiences can be quite useful to other developers.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

A visit from the Zune squad
It was weird to own a Zune in 2005. It is even weirder to own a Zune in 2021 — let alone 16 of them. And yet, 27-year-old Conner Woods proudly shows off his lineup on a kitchen table. They come in all different colors, shapes, and sizes, and each can be identified by that telltale black plastic D-pad just below the screen. He owns the entire scope of the brief Zune lineup — from the svelte Zune 4 to the chunky Zune HD — and among the microscopic community of people who still adore Microsoft’s much-derided MP3 player, no collection of dead tech could possibly be more enviable. But today, almost a decade after Microsoft terminated the brand, there is a small bastion of diehards who are still loving and listening to their Zunes. If you talk to them, they’ll tell you that these MP3 players are the best pieces of hardware to ever run a Windows operating system. Preserving the Zune legacy has just become another part of the hobby. I’ve never once seen a Zune in real life.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Apple knew a supplier was using child labor but took 3 years to fully cut ties
Apple is back under the spotlight over labor conditions in its supply chain following an explosive report from The Information on Thursday that revealed new details about the company’s reluctance to cut ties with suppliers who violate its ethics policies. According to the report, Apple learned in 2013 that Suyin Electronics, a China-based company that (at the time) made parts for its MacBooks, was employing underage workers, and despite telling Suyin to address the issue or risk losing business, Apple discovered additional workers as young as 14 years old during an audit just three months later. But rather than immediately cutting ties with Suyin for violating its supply chain ethics policies — which prohibit child labor and which Apple claims are the “highest standards” — Apple continued to rely on the company for more than three years, according to The Information. Any company – and their executives – knowingly and willingly using child labour, slave labour, or forced labour anywhere in the world should be tried as if they are committing these heinous acts in their home countries. The body of evidence that Apple is fully aware of its extensive use of child labour and forced labour in e.g. China’s Uighur concentration camps is extensive, and the fact Tim Cook can get away with this without ever having to face the consequences is disgusting. Tim Cook’s fellow Americans get life sentences for less. Of course, Apple is far from the only company guilty of this – just look at Nestle or Nike, for instance – but being the largest company in the world with the biggest, most arrogant mouth about how “ethical” they are should be the first to end up in court.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

FreeBSD quarterly status report for Q4 2020
This quarter had quite a lot of work done, including but certainly not limited to, in areas relating to everything from multiple architectures such as x86, aarch64, riscv, and ppc64 for both base and ports, over kernel changes such as vectored aio, routing lookups and multipathing, an alternative random(4) implementation, zstd integration for kernel dumps, log compression, zfs and preparations for pkg(8), along with wifi changes, changes to the toolchain like the new elfctl utility, and all the way to big changes like the git migration and moving the documentation from DocBook to Hugo/AsciiDoctor, as well as many other things too numerous to mention in an introduction. The best way to keep up with FreeBSD development from an outsider’s perspective. FreeBSD is on my radar for the UltraSPARC server-as-a-workstation project – a reader has donated a SunFire V245 that’s currently in shipping to me – so I’m trying to be a bit more in tune than I usually am with the world of FreeBSD.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Exploring swap on FreeBSD
On modern Unix-like systems such as FreeBSD, “swapping” refers to the activity of paging out the contents of memory to a disk and then paging it back in on demand. The page-out activity occurs in response to a lack of free memory in the system: the kernel tries to identify pages of memory that probably will not be accessed in the near future, and copies their contents to a disk for safekeeping until they are needed again. When an application attempts to access memory that has been swapped out, it blocks while the kernel fetches that saved memory from the swap disk, and then resumes execution as if nothing had happened. In 2021, cheap SSDs have become commonplace and have performance characteristics much better suited to swapping, so it seems worthwhile to revisit how swapping works in FreeBSD, and try to provide some insight into frequently raised issues. Some light reading for the weekend.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Genode’s roadmap for 2021
Herein, we lay out our plans for evolving Genode. Progress in addition to this planning will very much depend on the degree of community support the project will receive. The Challenges page collects some of our ideas to advance Genode in various further directions. The road map is not fixed. If there is commercial interest of pushing the Genode technology to a certain direction, we are willing to revisit our plans. This is a very detailed roadmap, but as clearly mentioned in the opening paragraphs, this is not set in stone, and things may change. Most of the planned focus seems to be on vastly improving support for ARM, for instance by working on bringing Genode to the PinePhone. They also want to streamline and improve the process for porting Linux device drivers to Genode, which should help in increasing hardware support.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

WhatsApp delays privacy changes following backlash
The WhatsApp messaging service announced on Friday that it would delay changes to new business features after people around the world criticized the new policy. The Facebook-owned company said it is “going to do a lot more to clear up misinformation around how privacy and security works on WhatsApp.” Privacy rights activists heavily criticized the WhatsApp changes, saying it was the latest step showing Facebook’s poor handling of user data. The real issue was a far larger than expected exodus of users to services like Signal and Telegram. I doubt Facebook will actually make any meaningful changes – instead, we’ll see a different tone or wording.
OSnews ~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

NewsBone.com
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~Created Wed Jan 27 19:06:16 2021

Pirate Bay founder gets jail term
Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Warg sentenced to three-and-half years in prison after being found guilty of hacking into Danish computers.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Millions hit in Drupal hack attack
Software firm Drupal warns millions to "assume" they have been hacked if they have not applied a patch for a recently discovered bug.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Former Android boss leaves Google
Andy Rubin steps down from Google, while his former colleague Daniel Graf is demoted at Twitter
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Big firms 'must condemn GamerGate'
Games publishers must "stand-up and condemn" the movement referred to as "GamerGate", says a developer forced to leave her home due to threats.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Hungary scraps controversial web tax
Hungary shelves a proposed tax on internet data traffic after tens of thousands of Hungarians marched against it.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Apple chief: 'I'm proud to be gay'
Apple chief executive Tim Cook has publicly acknowledged his sexuality, saying he wants to try to help people struggling with their identity.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Microsoft unveils fitness band
Microsoft unveils a wearable device that can track a user's sleep and exercise as well connect to a fitness tracking service on smartphones.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Data retention bill introduced
Data about phone and computer use will be kept by telecommunications companies for two years if a bill introduced to the Australian parliament is passed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Lenovo completes Motorola takeover
Lenovo completes a $2.9bn takeover of Google's Motorola handset division, which it says makes it the third biggest smartphone maker.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Speed boost for 4G in some cities
Two of the UK's mobile operators are turning on technology that boosts mobile speeds in a few UK cities.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Android smartwatch 'runs for a week'
New Android-powered smartwatches should last for a week or longer between charges thanks to their use of both e-ink and LCD screens.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Drones buzz French nuclear plants
An investigation begins after France's state-owned EDF power company says unidentified drones have flown over seven of its nuclear plants.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

China denies shutting foreign sites
The director of China's internet regulator admits that some foreign websites cannot be visited but denies shutting them down.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Samsung profit lowest in three years
Samsung Electronics sees its quarterly operating profit fall to its lowest level in more than three years because of slowing smartphone sales.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Software 'predicts' gang violence
London's Metropolitan Police test software designed to predict which gang members are most likely to commit violent crimes.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

HP wades into world of 3D printing
HP announces the launch of a 3D printer it says will be 10 times faster than current models.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

White House computers 'hacked'
US security services are reportedly investigating the breach of an unclassified network.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Google developing a cancer detector
Google is attempting to diagnose cancers, heart attack risks and other ailments with a system that combines nanoparticles and a wrist-worn sensor.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Samaritans app flags worrying tweets
An app launched by Samaritans notifies Twitter users if people they follow seem to be distressed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

AUDIO: UK to have new gaming centre
The UK is to have the first cultural centre in the world for gaming, which will be based in Nottingham.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Evolution of a robot care bear
Eight years after a prototype was showcased in Scotland, a robot bear is being trialled in a children's hospital in the US.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Playing music with your brain
Could technology turn you into a musical virtuoso? LJ Rich looks at new ways to make music.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: App helps you wake up with a stranger
The app that turns a global network of strangers into your alarm clock, with a dating twist.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Tech for night-time photography
A look at the latest gadgets which could make it easier to take the perfect night-time picture.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Smart mirror offers wrinkle advice
From mirrors that give advice to wireless kitchen appliances - the devices that could be in the house of the future.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Messaging app to tackle bullying
A school in South Carolina, US has developed an app which it hopes will maker pupils feel safer.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: The 'house of hacking horrors'
A suburban house has been transformed to help specialists find security flaws in smart devices and stop hackers taking control.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Blass: 'My leaks give phones a buzz'
One of the world's top technology leakers explains how he gathers his secrets.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: 'Whizz up hills' on fast e-bike
A prototype electronic bike (e-bike) which has a battery pack integrated into the frame has been developed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

A day without data
Is it possible to not share any information?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Fashion challenge for Apple's Ive
Can Apple design guru Jony Ive turn the smartwatch into a hit?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

The metal detectors saving marriages
The metal detectorists saving marriages
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

How will future city signs look?
Jetpacks, driverless cars and solar roads
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Simulator lets you feel gun's kick
What if you had a killer product on your hands - literally?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Can an app cure anxiety and stress?
Could a simple app banish your stress and anxiety forever?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Giant Samsung struggles at the top
Has the market finally caught up with Samsung?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Webcast: Navigating QuickBooks 2013 - Mar 19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Katie Cunningham Lynn Root at Let's Learn Python at PyCon - Mar 13-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Being Productive with Windows 8 - Mar 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

O'Reilly Strata Conference - Feb 26-28 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Hybrid Apps with PhoneGap - Feb 21 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Rich, High Performance Tools for Practical Data Analysis - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Thinking Big Together: Driving the Future of Data Science - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Christopher Schmitt at In Control Orlando 2013 Mobile and Web Design Conference - Feb 17-19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing for Data-driven Organizations - Feb 14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Tools of Change for Publishing Conference (TOC) - Feb 12-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: How Lean Startups Define, Measure, and Communicate Progress - Feb 8 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Using Windows XP in a Windows 8 Virtual Machine - Feb 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Bandit Algorithms for the Web - Feb 5 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: UX Design for Digital Books: Creating Engaging Digital Reading Experiences - Feb 1 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing And Creating A Social Book App Using Open-source Technologies - Jan 29 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Core Data

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

EPUB 3 Best Practices

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Windows Server 2012 Inside Out

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Secrets of Product Management - Jan 24 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: So you got a Raspberry Pi for the Holidays - Jan 23 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Data Warfare - Jan 22 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: 10 Steps to Product/Market Fit - Jan 18 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Principles of Mobile Interface Design - Jan 17 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

The Book of GIMP

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: HTML5 for Mobile Devices - Jan 16 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

NewsBone.com
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~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Securing the Black Hat Wi-Fi Network With Aruba's Cloud
Aruba uses new technology to minimize the on-site equipment needed to secure one of the most hostile conference environments in America.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Is Cisco's WPA Migration Mode Leaving Wi-Fi Users at Risk?
Researchers at Black Hat this week warn about a potential threat in Cisco 1200-series wireless access points, but the enterprise networking giant downplays the danger.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Intel Denies Any Reduction in WiMAX Commitment
The chip giant was forced to respond after Asian publication reported the dissolution of Intel's WiMAX promotional group.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Aerohive Revamps Free Online Wi-Fi Planner
With an update to its Wi-Fi planning tool, Aerohive has made it easier for networkers to plan for Wi-Fi deployments. Enterprise Networking Planet's review of the revamped tool says improved report output, a streamlined workflow and better interface make the tool accessible to more people while providing better results.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Meru Expands WLAN Service Assurance Portfolio
Spectrum analysis, security, and monitoring products increase reliability and cut TCO for Meru Virtual Cell WLANs.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Veriwave's WaveDeploy Raises the Bar on WLAN Assessment
Site assessment tool maps per-client application performance for what-if analysis, client certification, and SLA validation.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Google Apologizes for Snaring Wi-Fi Data
Google says it didn't mean to gather unsecured data as its cars roamed the streets putting together Street View images, but the search company learned it was doing just that as a result of a request for an audit from a German privacy authority.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

4G On the Brink of Massive Growth
Whether it's WiMAX or LTE, 4G is going to be growing in the next few years. While the two protocols coexist right now, what's the future going to hold?
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

SiBeam Introduces Wireless Video Streaming Chipset
By combining support two high-speed wireless protocols, the company hopes to usher in new, cheaper forms of high-definition wireless streaming.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Wi-Fi 2015: Where Is Wireless Networking Going?
With more than 1 billion devices on the market and 802.11n now standardized, what's next for the networking technology? A panel of networking experts at Interop peers into the crystal ball.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

FCC chief set for panto horse net neutrality settlement
Oh no he isn't
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Outlook for Mac update arrives with new Word and Excel apps coming next year
But Microsoft recommends deleting Office for Mac 2011 before using it
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Facebook takes to Tor for weird sort of anonymous socialising
It's anonymous, but everyone can see it and it's a bit weird
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Hungary scraps internet tax plans in wake of mass protests
Neelie Kroes welcomes the decision
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm sentenced for CSC hack
Three and a half years for computer hacking
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Amazon beats off Apple in US tablet satisfaction standings
That's one in the i for the handheld market
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Nexus 6 destined to flop owing to high price and pre-order disaster
Google demonstrates how not to release a smartphone
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Drupal flaw could hit millions of sites
Users of web content management system urged to close backdoor access
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

China will move to Linux by 2020 in 'de-Windowsifying' process
Chinese government advisor invents new word
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

iPhone 6 Plus review
Phablet is a welcome addition to Apple smartphone range
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Yosemite users reporting problems with WiFi connectivity
Others bemoan Bluetooth and Handoff issues
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Sony posts huge Q3 loss as smartphone sales continue to slide
But PS4 sales are on the up
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Google must pay Canadian woman over Street View cleavage boobie
Dcolletage will not help anyone find their way anywhere
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Intel settlement means cheap round for anyone who bought Pentium 4 processor
Offer also open to liars. But not Illinois residents.
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Best travel gadgets 2014
A rundown of this year's must-have gizmos for commuters and jetsetters
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung Galaxy A5 and A3 arrive with metal bodies and Android 4.4 Kitkat
Mid-range smartphones look to sway buyers away from the iPhone 6
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

LG Display develops 'world's narrowest' smartphone bezel at 0.7mm
Features on a 5.3in Full HD LCD smartphone panel
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Android Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Andy Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Windows 7 OEM licence availability reaches zero day
From today, it's 8 or 0
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Microsoft Band vs FitBit Charge HR specs comparison
We pit the two latest fitness tracking wearables head to head
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay's Svartholm found guilty in Danish hacking case
Jury rejects remote access plea
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Liberty exposes secret links between GCHQ and the NSA
Papers prove private access deal
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung closes in on Apple's iPad with 18.3 percent of global tablet market
Firm sees a 5.6 percent rise in sales in the third quarter
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Material makeover meets many Android apps as Lollipop launch looms
Plus new Bookmark Manager, and Google Now knows your bank balance
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

NewsBone.com
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~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

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