NewsBone.com - Barebones News
Tech - Linux/BSD - Apache - Security - Hardware - Gaming - Autos - World - Entertainment - About
+ Slashdot ~ OSNews ~ BBCTechnology ~ O'ReillyNews ~ Wi-FiPlanet ~ CRN +

QAnon/8Chan Sites Back Online After Being Ousted By DDoS-Protection Vendor
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A few dozen QAnon and 8chan-related sites were knocked offline temporarily yesterday when a DDoS-protection vendor disabled their access, according to an article by security reporter Brian Krebs. The websites [...] are connected to the Internet via the US-based ISP VanwaTech, which in turn "had a single point of failure on its end," Krebs wrote. "The swath of Internet addresses serving the various 8kun/QAnon sites were being protected from otherwise crippling and incessant distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks by Hillsboro, Ore. based CNServers LLC." That changed yesterday when security researcher Ron Guilmette called CNServers, which apparently didn't realize it was providing security protection to the websites. "Within minutes of that call, CNServers told its customer -- Spartan Host Ltd., which is registered in Belfast, Northern Ireland -- that it would no longer be providing DDoS protection for the set of 254 Internet addresses that Spartan Host was routing on behalf of VanwaTech," Krebs wrote. Those 254 addresses included the few dozen related to QAnon and 8chan, which is now known as 8kun. The websites didn't remain offline for long because Spartan Host quickly "changed its settings so that VanwaTech's Internet addresses were protected from attacks by ddos-guard[.]net, a company based in St. Petersburg, Russia," Krebs wrote. "VanwaTech CEO Nick Lim in November 2019 defended his company's role in keeping 8kun websites online, writing on Twitter, 'I do what I do because I truly believe in free speech and I believe in protecting people from cyber security attacks,'" adds Ars Technica. Spartan Host founder Ryan McCully told Krebs yesterday that he intends to keep VanwaTech as a customer. "We follow the 'law of the land' when deciding what we allow to be hosted with us, with some exceptions to things that may cause resource issues etc.," McCully told Krebs. "Just because we host something, it doesn't say anything about [what] we do and don't support; our opinions don't come into hosted content decisions." Further reading: Is QAnon an 8Chan Game Gone Wrong?
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

A Group of Materials Called Perovskites Could Be a Game-Changer For Solar Power
Researchers from Australia have discovered that the widely acclaimed mineral perovskite can be used to transform the solar industry through cheaper and more efficient photovoltaics. The Independent reports: Perovskite, which is forged deep within the Earth's mantle, has been hailed for its unprecedented potential to convert sunlight into electricity. Researchers have already improved its sunlight-to-energy efficiency from around 3 per cent to over 20 per cent in the space of just a few years. "It's unbelievable, a miracle material," Z. Valy Vardeny, a materials science professor from the University of Utah, said about perovskite in 2017. At the time it was thought that it would be at least 10 years before it reached a point that the material could be used in commercial solar cells, however the latest breakthrough could see the wide uptake of the technology much sooner. "It was one of those unusual discoveries that you sometimes hear about in science," said Dr Hall from the University of Melbourne. With the help of researchers at the University of Sydney, the scientists were able to use computational modeling to solve the problem of instability within the material when exposed to sunlight. The unlikely solution was to undo the disruption caused by light at lower intensities by focussing the light into a high-intensity beam. Dr Hall added: "What we've shown is that you can actually use the material in the state that you want to use it, for a solar cell - all you need to do is focus more light onto it." The research could also have significant implications for data storage, with perovskites offering a way to dramatically increase a device's potential capacity. The study has been published in the journal Nature Materials.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

IKEA To Buy Back Used Furniture In Recycling Push
Last week, the BBC reported that IKEA, the world's biggest furniture business, is planning to launch a scheme to buy back your unwanted furniture you no longer need or want. From the report: Under the plan, it will offer vouchers worth up to 50% of the original price, to be spent at its stores. The "Buy Back" initiative will launch to coincide with Black Friday. "By making sustainable living more simple and accessible, Ikea hopes that the initiative will help its customers take a stand against excessive consumption this Black Friday and in the years to come," it said in reference to November 27, when lots of retailers offer discounts on their products. The international scheme will see customers given vouchers to spend at Ikea stores, the value of which will depend on the condition of the items they are returning. Customers must log the item they wish to return and will then be given an estimate of its value. "As new" items, with no scratches, will get 50% of the original price, "very good" items, with minor scratches, will get 40% and "well used," with several scratches, will get 30%. They should then return them -- fully assembled -- to the returns desk where they will be checked and the final value agreed. The offer, which will run in 27 countries, applies to furniture typically without upholstery, such as the famous Billy bookcases, chairs, stools, desks and dining tables. Ikea said that anything that cannot be resold will be recycled. Ikea plans to have dedicated areas in every store where people can sell back their old furniture and find repaired or refurbished furniture.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Google Confirms the Nest Secure Has Been Discontinued
Google's Nest Secure alarm system, which was discussed on Slashdot for featuring an unlisted, disabled microphone, has been discontinued by Google, though it will continue functioning. Android Police reports: Google released the Nest Guard in 2017 as a simple security system with motion sensors and a keypad, but it never received an upgrade, even as other Nest devices were updated again and again. The product page for the Nest Guard on the Google Store was updated last week with a 'No longer available' message, possibly indicating it had been discontinued. Google later confirmed to Android Police that the Nest Guard will no longer be sold, but it will continue to work for people who have already bought it.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Chess's Cheating Crisis: 'Paranoia Has Become the Culture'
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: In one chess tournament, five of the top six were disqualified for cheating. In another, the doting parents of 10-year-old competitors furiously rejected evidence that their darlings were playing at the level of the world No 1. And in a third, an Armenian grandmaster booted out for suspicious play accused his opponent of "doing pipi in his Pampers." These incidents may sound extreme but they are not isolated -- and they have all taken place online since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Chess has enjoyed a huge boom in internet play this year as in-person events have moved online and people stuck at home have sought new hobbies. But with that has come a significant new problem: a rise in the use of powerful chess calculators to cheat on a scale reminiscent of the scandals that have dogged cycling and athletics. One leading 'chess detective' said that the pandemic was "without doubt creating a crisis". At the heart of the problem are programs or apps that can rapidly calculate near-perfect moves in any situation. To counter these engines, players in more and more top matches must agree to be recorded by multiple cameras, be available on Zoom or WhatsApp at any time, and grant remote access to their computers. They may not be allowed to leave their screens, even for toilet breaks. In some cases they must have a "proctor" or invigilator search their room and then sit with them throughout a match. [E]ye-tracking programs may be a way to raise a red flag if a player appears to be looking away with suspicious frequency. Chess.com, the world's biggest site for online play, said it had seen 12 million new users this year, against 6.5 million last year. The cheating rate has jumped from between 5,000 and 6,000 players banned each month last year to a high of almost 17,000 in August. The growth in cheating and a corresponding explosion in social media discussion of the problem has created a new atmosphere of suspicion and recrimination. "Paranoia has become the culture," said Le-Marechal, whom a friend declared "the cyber chess detective" when he got the job. "There is this very romantic vision of the game which is being scuppered." Without a significant culture change, most say, the cheats are unlikely to go straight.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Instagram's Handling of Kids' Data Is Now Being Probed In the EU
Facebook's lead data regulator in Europe has opened another two probes into its business empire -- both focused on how the Instagram platform processes children's information. TechCrunch reports: The action by Ireland's Data Protection Commission (DPC), reported earlier by the Telegraph, comes more than a year after a U.S. data scientist reported concerns to Instagram that its platform was leaking the contact information of minors. David Stier went on to publish details of his investigation last year -- saying Instagram had failed to make changes to prevent minors' data being accessible. He found that children who changed their Instagram account settings to a business account had their contact info (such as an email address and phone number) displayed unmasked via the platform -- arguing that "millions" of children had had their contact information exposed as a result of how Instagram functions. Facebook disputes Stier's characterization of the issue -- saying it has always made it clear that contact info is displayed if people choose to switch to a business account on Instagram. It also does now let people opt out of having their contact info displayed if they switch to a business account. Nonetheless, its lead EU regulator has now said it has identified "potential concerns" relating to how Instagram processes children's data. "The DPC has been actively monitoring complaints received from individuals in this area and has identified potential concerns in relation to the processing of children's personal data on Instagram which require further examination," it writes. The regulator's statement specifies that the first inquiry will examine the legal basis Facebook claims for processing children's data on the Instagram platform, and also whether or not there are adequate safeguards in place. [...] The DPC says the second inquiry will focus on the Instagram profile and account settings -- looking at "the appropriateness of these settings for children." "Amongst other matters, this Inquiry will explore Facebook's adherence with the requirements in the GDPR in respect to Data Protection by Design and Default and specifically in relation to Facebook's responsibility to protect the data protection rights of children as vulnerable persons," it adds. A Facebook company spokesperson said in a statement: "We've always been clear that when people choose to set up a business account on Instagram, the contact information they shared would be publicly displayed. That's very different to exposing people's information. We've also made several updates to business accounts since the time of Mr. Stier's mischaracterization in 2019, and people can now opt out of including their contact information entirely. We're in close contact with the IDPC and we're cooperating with their inquiries."
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Microsoft Adds Option To Disable JScript In Internet Explorer
As part of the October 2020 Patch Tuesday security updates, Microsoft has added a new option to Windows to let system administrators disable the JScript component inside Internet Explorer. ZDNet reports: The JScript scripting engine is an old component that was initially included with Internet Explorer 3.0 in 1996 and was Microsoft's own dialect of the ECMAScript standard (the JavaScript language). Development on the JScript engine ended, and the component was deprecated with the release of Internet Explorer 8.0 in 2009, but the engine remained in all Windows OS versions as a legacy component inside IE. Across the years, threat actors realized they could attack the JScript engine, as Microsoft wasn't actively developing it and only rarely shipped security updates, usually only when attacked by threat actors. [...] Now, 11 years after deprecating the component, Microsoft is finally giving system administrators a way to disable JScript execution by default. According to Microsoft, the October 2020 Patch Tuesday introduces new registry keys that system administrators can apply and block the jscript.dll file from executing code. Details on how this can be done are available below, as taken from Microsoft's documentation.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Tesla Powerwall Rival Seeks To Bring Hydrogen Into Your Home
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: It's about the size of Tesla Inc.'s Powerwall, but can store up to three times as much energy over a longer period. That's the promise of a new hydrogen-based energy-storage system for homes and businesses being developed by Australian startup Lavo Hydrogen Technology Ltd. The technology, developed with scientists at the University of New South Wales, uses power from rooftop solar panels to produce hydrogen from water by electrolysis. The gas is stored in a metal hydride container and converted back into electricity when needed using a fuel cell. Australia's world-beating rooftop-solar take-up rates make it an ideal early market, said Lavo Chief Executive Officer Alan Yu. The unit will go on sale from November, with installations starting in June 2021, subject to final approvals. The company plans to sell 10,000 units a year by 2022. At about triple the price of a Powerwall, the Lavo unit's main selling point will be its ability to store more energy for longer. Each system will initially cost A$34,750 ($24,620) and will be able to hold 40 kilowatt-hours of power -- enough to supply an average household for more than two days, according to the company. Tesla's Powerwall holds about 13.5 kilowatt-hours. Lavo's Yu acknowledged that the higher cost of the system might initially limit interest to energy-technology enthusiasts initially, but he also sees it as a solution for small off-grid rural villages to replace diesel generators or a compact solution for communities and homes cut off from the main grid by natural disasters such as bushfires.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

OpenBSD Turns 25 With a New Release
ArchieBunker writes: The OpenBSD project has turned 25 years old and is celebrating this with release 6.8.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Apple Launches 'Apple Music TV', a 24-Hour Music Video Livestream
Apple has launched Apple Music TV, a free 24-hour curated livestream of popular music videos that will also include "exclusive new music videos and premiers, special curated music video blocks, and live shows and events as well as chart countdowns and guests," according to the announcement. From a report: Apple Music TV will be available to U.S. residents only on the Apple Music app and the Apple TV app. It can be found at apple.co/AppleMusicTV and in the browse tab in the Apple Music and Apple TV app. The service premiered Monday morning with a countdown of the top 100 all-time most-streamed songs in the U.S. on Apple Music. On Thursday (October 22), it will celebrate the upcoming release of Bruce Springsteens's "Letter to You" album with an "all day Bruce takeover" featuring music-video blocks of his most popular videos, an interview with Zane Lowe, anchor of Apple Music's radio station, and a special livestream fan event.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

EU Shoots For $11.7B 'Industrial Cloud' To Rival US
The European Union aims to spend up to 10 billion euro ($11.7 million) over the next seven years to help build up a homegrown cloud computing sector that could rival foreign corporations such as Amazon, Google and Alibaba. From a report: Twenty-five EU countries signed a joint declaration last week pledging public money to power up the cloud sector and establishing the "European Alliance on Industrial Data and Cloud," a partnership geared toward facilitating such projects. The alliance -- whose funding is to be drawn from existing EU programs and hoped-for pledges from industry and national capitals -- will be launched by the end of the year. Cyprus and Denmark were the only EU member countries not to sign the declaration due to "technical reasons." The declaration "is a foundation stone for the establishment of European cloud technology, which will be very high performing," said Internal Market Commissioner Thierry Breton, following a meeting of European telecoms ministers organized by the German government, which currently holds the EU's rotating Council presidency. "Contrary to the prejudices, we are not late [on cloud development]. We are the first to get involved in the industrial cloud," he added.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

US Charges Russian Hackers Behind NotPetya, KillDisk, OlympicDestroyer Attacks
The US Department of Justice has unsealed charges today against six Russian nationals believed to be part of one of Russia's most elite and secretive hacking groups, universally known as Sandworm. From a report: US officials said all six nationals are officers in Unit 74455 of the Russian Main Intelligence Directorate (GRU), a military intelligence agency of the Russian Army, DOJ officials said today. Under orders from the Russian government, US officials said the six (believed to be part of a much larger group) conducted cyber-attacks on behalf of the Russian government with the intent to destabilize other countries, interfere in their internal politics, and cause havoc and monetary losses. Their attacks span the last decade and include some of the biggest cyber-attacks known to date: Ukrainian Government & Critical Infrastructure (between December 2015 to December 2016), French Elections (April and May 2017), Worldwide Businesses and Critical Infrastructure (aka NotPetya; June 2017), PyeongChang Winter Olympics Hosts, Participants, Partners, and Attendees (December 2017 through February 2018), PyeongChang Winter Olympics IT Systems (aka Olympic Destroyer; 2017 through February 2018), Novichok Poisoning Investigations (April 2018), and Georgian Companies and Government Entities (a 2018 spearphishing campaign targeting a major media company, 2019 efforts to compromise the network of Parliament, and a wide-ranging website defacement campaign in 2019.)
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Marvel Shortens Window Between Print and Digital Comics
Marvel Entertainment has announced that it is halving the wait time for fans choosing to read releases on its digital subscription Marvel Unlimited, with titles now appearing on the service just three months after print release. The change takes effect immediately. From a report: Marvel Unlimited launched in 2007, and offers access to the publisher's digital library of titles -- currently numbering more than 27,000 issues -- for either a monthly or annual subscription fee. The service is available as an iOS, Android and web app.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Drivers To Be Banned From Picking Up Mobile Phones
It will become illegal for anyone in the UK to pick up and use their mobile phone while driving, under new legislation to be enacted next year. From a report: The change will end a loophole that can allow drivers to escape punishment for using a hand-held phone to take a photo or play a game. Mobiles will still be able to be used to pay for a drive-through takeaway. And drivers will still be able to use devices hands-free under the plans, the Department for Transport said. At present, making phone calls and sending text messages are banned while driving. Ministers have rejected calls to also ban the use of hands-free function, for example using a sat-nav in a phone cradle. Roads minister Baroness Vere said hand-held phone use behind the wheel was "distracting and dangerous" and that "for too long risky drivers have been able to escape punishment." The change in law would apply across the UK and is expected to come into effect early next year, depending on the outcome of the consultation.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

Raspberry Pi Foundation Launches Compute Module 4 for Industrial Users
The Raspberry Pi Foundation is launching a new product today -- the Compute Module 4. From a report: If you've been keeping an eye on the Raspberry Pi releases, you know that the flagship Raspberry Pi 4 was released in June 2019. The Compute Module 4 features the same processor, but packed in a compute module for industrial use cases. A traditional Raspberry Pi is a single-board computer with a ton of ports sticking out. Compute Modules are somewhat different. Those system-on-module variants are more compact single-board computers without any traditional port. It lets you create a prototype using a traditional Raspberry Pi, and then order a bunch of Compute Modules to embed in your commercial products. "Over half of the seven million Raspberry Pi units we sell each year go into industrial and commercial applications, from digital signage to thin clients to process automation," Eben Upton wrote on the Raspberry Pi blog. Some things are strictly similar between the Raspberry Pi 4 and the Compute Module 4, such as the 64-bit ARM-based processor with VideoCore VI graphics. This is going to represent a huge upgrade for previous Compute Module customers. In particular, you get much better video performance with 4Kp60 hardware decode for H.265 videos, 1080p60 hardware decode for H.264 videos, 1080p30 hardware encode of H.264 videos. You can also take advantage of the dual HDMI interfaces to connect up to two 4K displays at 60 frames per second.
Slashdot ~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

NewsBone.com
Suggest a feed to syndicate here, or check out what I'm doing over at freshtao.
~Created Tue Oct 20 02:27:20 2020

After outcry, Microsoft presses pause on unsolicited Windows 10 web app installs
On Saturday, I pointed out how Microsoft force-restarting Windows 10 computers to install unwanted web apps was the latest proof you don’t own your own Windows PC. Today, the company says it was at least partly a mistake — and will be pausing the “migration” that brought web apps to your Start Menu this way. Originally, Microsoft tells The Verge, the idea was that any website you pinned to the Start Menu would launch in Microsoft Edge. If your website of choice had a PWA web app version, the Edge browser could automatically launch that as well. But — in what Microsoft seems to be calling a bug, though we’re trying to get clarity as to which part was the bug — the change also made it look like existing web shortcuts to its own Microsoft Office products had installed a web app on your PC as well. Ah, the “it’s a bug” defense. Not very imaginative. This is the kind of nonsense you have to put up with when you choose to use a closed source operating system or device that you merely license or borrow, not own. The slippery slope people have been talking and warning about for decades when it comes to closed source software has made it so that not only do we seem to accept this behaviour, people even defend it. Windows as an operating system is in this weird place right now where its guts are, by all accounts, in very good shape, while the user interface is messy and Metro applications are a failure, leading to an often startling user experience that switches from old Win32-looking applications to modern flat applications every other application, and many settings are hidden in old Win32 dialogs instead of being available in fancy modern ones. On top of all that, Microsoft has added tremendous amounts of telemetry, ads, and even forced installation and reinstallation of applications through updates. They built up massive positive mindshare with Windows 7, lost some of it with Windows 8, and then regained some of it with Windows 10 – only to just lose it all over again with nonsense like this. At this point, I have no idea where Microsoft wants to take Windows. It feels like the pace of development is minimal from a user’s point of view, while at the same time still being somehow fast enough that things regularly break. Why would anyone willingly use a platform like this? What redeeming qualities does it have over the competition?
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Apple’s CUPS repository has died a quiet death
The Common Unix Printing System (CUPS) is something all the GNU/Linux distributions use to manage printers. It’s been maintained by Apple since 2007. The Apple-lead CUPS development efforts appear to have completely died out after lead CUPS developer Michael Sweet left the company. CUPS isn’t dead, though, Sweet and others are still working on it in a fork maintained by the OpenPrinting organization. Usually, these stories end in tears, with a desperate plea for interested parties and potential contributors to join and save the project. Luckily, this is not one of those stories – the Common Unix Printing System is safe, thanks to the wonders of open source.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Chrome exempts Google sites from user site data settings
In Google Chrome’s “Cookies and site data” settings, accessible via the Preferences menu item or directly with chrome://settings/cookies in the address bar, you can enable the setting “Clear cookies and site data when you quit Chrome”. However, I’ve discovered that Chrome exempts Google’s own sites, such as Search and YouTube, from this setting. I don’t want to sound like a broken record, but this really shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone. Technology companies are particularly adept at being hostile towards users, and Google is no exception.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

OpenBSD 6.8 released
OpenBSD has marked its 25th birthday with a brand new release – OpenBSD 6.8. One of the major new features is support for 64bit PowerPC processors – POWER8 and POWER9 specifically, and the Raptor Computing Systems Talos II and Blackbird platforms in particular.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

So you want to build an embedded Linux system?
This article is targeted at embedded engineers who are familiar with microcontrollers but not with microprocessors or Linux, so I wanted to put together something with a quick primer on why you’d want to run embedded Linux, a broad overview of what’s involved in designing around application processors, and then a dive into some specific parts you should check out — and others you should avoid — for entry-level embedded Linux systems. This is some seriously detailed writing, and an amazing starting point for people interested in developing for embedded Linux.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Revisiting Apple Copland (D7E1 build)
This is my second video about Apple’s Copland operating system, and I plan on doing more coverage on the other builds sometime in the future. Copland, despite being a hilarious failure, is an interesting system to mess around with for fun. This video covers D7E1 which is the earliest leaked build. A very detailed video about Copland, one of Apple’s many ill-fated attempts at modernising and/or replacing the ageing Mac OS back in the ’90s. The maker of the video is running Copland on real hardware, so no virtualisation shenanigans here.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

What if we had local-first software?
An interesting thought exercise. What if the Internet had never become a giant vacuum for malevolent ad agencies and desktops hadn’t become stupidly over provisioned thin clients for web pages? Instead, what if the Internet was only used to facilitate data synchronization between endpoints? Could we get there from our current place? Let’s ask ourselves: “what if the Internet was offline first? And what if we had local-first software paving the way into an offline SaaS model?” Actually, the authors of this paper (“Local-First Software: You Own Your Data, in spite of the Cloud”) raise these exact same questions in their work, and it’ll be our matter at hand today. How would an offline-first Internet look like?
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Sega Master System architecture: a practical analysis
The Master System comes from a long line of succession. What started as a collection of off-the-shelf components, has now gained a new identity thanks to Sega’s engineering. A very detailed look at Sega’s first international console, the Master System.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

SDL2 upstreams OS/2 Support
If 2020 couldn’t get more peculiar, today the SDL2 project mainlined support for the OS/2 operating system. While OS/2 is no longer maintained by IBM and was never really a gaming platform for where SDL2 is most commonly used, this software library that serves as an abstraction layer for multimedia/gaming hardware components and software platforms has merged the OS/2 port. Neat.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Sailfish OS 3.4 released
The headline improvement in this new version of Sailfish OS is a big upgrade tot he browser engine. We’ve upgraded the browser engine to Gecko ESR52. This makes using the Sailfish OS browser already much more enjoyable! This isn’t the end of the story though, and is in fact just the first step of our plan to gradually upgrade the browser. As the browser is open source, some of you may have already noticed from the repositories that we are continuing to upgrade the engine for upcoming releases. Newer browser engine versions bring in thousands of bug fixes, improvements to the rendering and compatibility with various newer browser technologies. On top of that, this release brings experimental Rust support, the first steps towards 64bit ARM support – about time, I would say – and support for multiple users on a single device.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

KDE Plasma 5.20 released
A big update for the venerable KDE desktop. Everyday utilities and tools, such as the Panels, Task Manager, Notifications and System Settings, have all been overhauled to make them more usable, efficient, and friendlier. Meanwhile, developers are hard at work adapting Plasma and all its bits and pieces to Wayland. Once done, Plasma will not only be readier for the future, but will also work better with touchscreens and multiple screens with different refresh rates and DPIs. Plasma will also offer better support for hardware-accelerated graphics, be more secure, and enjoy many more advantages. Although still work in progress, 5.20 already offers users many of the benefits of Plasma on Wayland. This is a substantial release that’s pretty much a must for every KDE user. I can’t wait until Wayland can truly be used as the default, and I feel that moment is actually quite, quite close now.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Petit FAT file system module
Petit FatFs is a sub-set of FatFs module for tiny 8-bit microcontrollers. It is written in compliance with ANSI C and completely separated from the disk I/O layer. It can be incorporated into the tiny microcontrollers with limited memory even if the RAM size is less than sector size. Also full featured FAT file system module is available here. Fascinating little project.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Linux 5.9 released
Linux 5.9 is out as the 2020 autumn kernel update. Linux 5.9 has a number of exciting improvements including initial support for upcoming Radeon RX 6000 “RDNA 2” graphics cards, initial Intel Rocket Lake graphics, NVMe zoned namespaces (ZNS) support, various storage improvements, IBM’s initial work on POWER10 CPU bring-up, the FSGSBASE instruction is now used, 32-bit x86 Clang build support, and more. It will make its way to your distribution eventually, to your separate kernel repository, or, for the brave ones, to your compile command.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Everything you need to know about Android’s Project Mainline
One of the biggest changes in Android in recent years that flew under the radar, relatively speaking against its importance, was the introduction of Project Mainline in Android 10. Google mandates the inclusion of specific Mainline modules across Android releases, with Android 11 coming in with a combined compulsory total of 25 Mainline modules. Here is an explanation on what Project Mainline is and what it aims to solve, alongside a list of all of Android’s Project Mainline modules. A great overview of this very important, relatively new part of Android.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Apple tells secure messaging app Telegram to take down protestor channels in Belarus
Apple is requesting that Telegram shut down three channels used in Belarus to expose the identities of individuals belonging to the Belarusian authoritarian regime that may be oppressing civilians. Apple’s concern is that revealing the identities of law enforcement individuals may give rise to further violence. Telegram, however, would prefer to keep the channels open, but the company said that it feels it has no choice in the matter. These channels are a tool for Belarus’ citizens protesting the recently rigged presidential election, but, with a centralized entity like Apple calling the shots on its own App Store, there’s little the protesters can do about it, explains Telegram CEO Pavel Durov. That’s what happens when you’re a company with zero morals and values, run by people with zero morals and values. We here in the west just accept that it’s entirely okay for corporations to value money over human lives and our core democratic ideals of freedom of liberty, because we’ve been brainwashed that it’s not just acceptable, but entirely desirable to sacrifice every shred of dignity at the altar of shareholder value. Putting money and shareholders above all else is not a a law of nature, it is not a universal constant – it is a choice. Unless we all shed centuries of indoctrination about the sacredness of shareholder value – from the Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie, the first shareholder-owned company and arguably the most valuable company in human history, and its institutional use of violence, exploitation, and slavery, all the way to Apple, the current most valuable company in the world, and its role in the Chinese surveillance state and thus the genocide taking place there – we will continue to sit idly by as our fellow men and women on the street in our neighbouring countries suffer and the world we live in gets destroyed.
OSnews ~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

NewsBone.com
Suggest a feed to syndicate here, or check out what I'm doing over at freshtao.
~Created Tue Oct 20 01:06:16 2020

Pirate Bay founder gets jail term
Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Warg sentenced to three-and-half years in prison after being found guilty of hacking into Danish computers.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Millions hit in Drupal hack attack
Software firm Drupal warns millions to "assume" they have been hacked if they have not applied a patch for a recently discovered bug.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Former Android boss leaves Google
Andy Rubin steps down from Google, while his former colleague Daniel Graf is demoted at Twitter
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Big firms 'must condemn GamerGate'
Games publishers must "stand-up and condemn" the movement referred to as "GamerGate", says a developer forced to leave her home due to threats.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Hungary scraps controversial web tax
Hungary shelves a proposed tax on internet data traffic after tens of thousands of Hungarians marched against it.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Apple chief: 'I'm proud to be gay'
Apple chief executive Tim Cook has publicly acknowledged his sexuality, saying he wants to try to help people struggling with their identity.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Microsoft unveils fitness band
Microsoft unveils a wearable device that can track a user's sleep and exercise as well connect to a fitness tracking service on smartphones.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Data retention bill introduced
Data about phone and computer use will be kept by telecommunications companies for two years if a bill introduced to the Australian parliament is passed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Lenovo completes Motorola takeover
Lenovo completes a $2.9bn takeover of Google's Motorola handset division, which it says makes it the third biggest smartphone maker.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Speed boost for 4G in some cities
Two of the UK's mobile operators are turning on technology that boosts mobile speeds in a few UK cities.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Android smartwatch 'runs for a week'
New Android-powered smartwatches should last for a week or longer between charges thanks to their use of both e-ink and LCD screens.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Drones buzz French nuclear plants
An investigation begins after France's state-owned EDF power company says unidentified drones have flown over seven of its nuclear plants.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

China denies shutting foreign sites
The director of China's internet regulator admits that some foreign websites cannot be visited but denies shutting them down.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Samsung profit lowest in three years
Samsung Electronics sees its quarterly operating profit fall to its lowest level in more than three years because of slowing smartphone sales.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Software 'predicts' gang violence
London's Metropolitan Police test software designed to predict which gang members are most likely to commit violent crimes.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

HP wades into world of 3D printing
HP announces the launch of a 3D printer it says will be 10 times faster than current models.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

White House computers 'hacked'
US security services are reportedly investigating the breach of an unclassified network.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Google developing a cancer detector
Google is attempting to diagnose cancers, heart attack risks and other ailments with a system that combines nanoparticles and a wrist-worn sensor.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Samaritans app flags worrying tweets
An app launched by Samaritans notifies Twitter users if people they follow seem to be distressed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

AUDIO: UK to have new gaming centre
The UK is to have the first cultural centre in the world for gaming, which will be based in Nottingham.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Evolution of a robot care bear
Eight years after a prototype was showcased in Scotland, a robot bear is being trialled in a children's hospital in the US.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Playing music with your brain
Could technology turn you into a musical virtuoso? LJ Rich looks at new ways to make music.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: App helps you wake up with a stranger
The app that turns a global network of strangers into your alarm clock, with a dating twist.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Tech for night-time photography
A look at the latest gadgets which could make it easier to take the perfect night-time picture.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Smart mirror offers wrinkle advice
From mirrors that give advice to wireless kitchen appliances - the devices that could be in the house of the future.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Messaging app to tackle bullying
A school in South Carolina, US has developed an app which it hopes will maker pupils feel safer.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: The 'house of hacking horrors'
A suburban house has been transformed to help specialists find security flaws in smart devices and stop hackers taking control.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Blass: 'My leaks give phones a buzz'
One of the world's top technology leakers explains how he gathers his secrets.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: 'Whizz up hills' on fast e-bike
A prototype electronic bike (e-bike) which has a battery pack integrated into the frame has been developed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

A day without data
Is it possible to not share any information?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Fashion challenge for Apple's Ive
Can Apple design guru Jony Ive turn the smartwatch into a hit?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

The metal detectors saving marriages
The metal detectorists saving marriages
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

How will future city signs look?
Jetpacks, driverless cars and solar roads
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Simulator lets you feel gun's kick
What if you had a killer product on your hands - literally?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Can an app cure anxiety and stress?
Could a simple app banish your stress and anxiety forever?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Giant Samsung struggles at the top
Has the market finally caught up with Samsung?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Webcast: Navigating QuickBooks 2013 - Mar 19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Katie Cunningham Lynn Root at Let's Learn Python at PyCon - Mar 13-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Being Productive with Windows 8 - Mar 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

O'Reilly Strata Conference - Feb 26-28 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Hybrid Apps with PhoneGap - Feb 21 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Rich, High Performance Tools for Practical Data Analysis - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Thinking Big Together: Driving the Future of Data Science - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Christopher Schmitt at In Control Orlando 2013 Mobile and Web Design Conference - Feb 17-19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing for Data-driven Organizations - Feb 14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Tools of Change for Publishing Conference (TOC) - Feb 12-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: How Lean Startups Define, Measure, and Communicate Progress - Feb 8 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Using Windows XP in a Windows 8 Virtual Machine - Feb 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Bandit Algorithms for the Web - Feb 5 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: UX Design for Digital Books: Creating Engaging Digital Reading Experiences - Feb 1 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing And Creating A Social Book App Using Open-source Technologies - Jan 29 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Core Data

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

EPUB 3 Best Practices

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Windows Server 2012 Inside Out

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Secrets of Product Management - Jan 24 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: So you got a Raspberry Pi for the Holidays - Jan 23 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Data Warfare - Jan 22 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: 10 Steps to Product/Market Fit - Jan 18 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Principles of Mobile Interface Design - Jan 17 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

The Book of GIMP

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: HTML5 for Mobile Devices - Jan 16 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

NewsBone.com
Suggest a feed to syndicate here, or check out what I'm doing over at freshtao.
~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Securing the Black Hat Wi-Fi Network With Aruba's Cloud
Aruba uses new technology to minimize the on-site equipment needed to secure one of the most hostile conference environments in America.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Is Cisco's WPA Migration Mode Leaving Wi-Fi Users at Risk?
Researchers at Black Hat this week warn about a potential threat in Cisco 1200-series wireless access points, but the enterprise networking giant downplays the danger.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Intel Denies Any Reduction in WiMAX Commitment
The chip giant was forced to respond after Asian publication reported the dissolution of Intel's WiMAX promotional group.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Aerohive Revamps Free Online Wi-Fi Planner
With an update to its Wi-Fi planning tool, Aerohive has made it easier for networkers to plan for Wi-Fi deployments. Enterprise Networking Planet's review of the revamped tool says improved report output, a streamlined workflow and better interface make the tool accessible to more people while providing better results.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Meru Expands WLAN Service Assurance Portfolio
Spectrum analysis, security, and monitoring products increase reliability and cut TCO for Meru Virtual Cell WLANs.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Veriwave's WaveDeploy Raises the Bar on WLAN Assessment
Site assessment tool maps per-client application performance for what-if analysis, client certification, and SLA validation.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Google Apologizes for Snaring Wi-Fi Data
Google says it didn't mean to gather unsecured data as its cars roamed the streets putting together Street View images, but the search company learned it was doing just that as a result of a request for an audit from a German privacy authority.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

4G On the Brink of Massive Growth
Whether it's WiMAX or LTE, 4G is going to be growing in the next few years. While the two protocols coexist right now, what's the future going to hold?
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

SiBeam Introduces Wireless Video Streaming Chipset
By combining support two high-speed wireless protocols, the company hopes to usher in new, cheaper forms of high-definition wireless streaming.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Wi-Fi 2015: Where Is Wireless Networking Going?
With more than 1 billion devices on the market and 802.11n now standardized, what's next for the networking technology? A panel of networking experts at Interop peers into the crystal ball.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

FCC chief set for panto horse net neutrality settlement
Oh no he isn't
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Outlook for Mac update arrives with new Word and Excel apps coming next year
But Microsoft recommends deleting Office for Mac 2011 before using it
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Facebook takes to Tor for weird sort of anonymous socialising
It's anonymous, but everyone can see it and it's a bit weird
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Hungary scraps internet tax plans in wake of mass protests
Neelie Kroes welcomes the decision
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm sentenced for CSC hack
Three and a half years for computer hacking
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Amazon beats off Apple in US tablet satisfaction standings
That's one in the i for the handheld market
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Nexus 6 destined to flop owing to high price and pre-order disaster
Google demonstrates how not to release a smartphone
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Drupal flaw could hit millions of sites
Users of web content management system urged to close backdoor access
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

China will move to Linux by 2020 in 'de-Windowsifying' process
Chinese government advisor invents new word
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

iPhone 6 Plus review
Phablet is a welcome addition to Apple smartphone range
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Yosemite users reporting problems with WiFi connectivity
Others bemoan Bluetooth and Handoff issues
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Sony posts huge Q3 loss as smartphone sales continue to slide
But PS4 sales are on the up
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Google must pay Canadian woman over Street View cleavage boobie
Dcolletage will not help anyone find their way anywhere
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Intel settlement means cheap round for anyone who bought Pentium 4 processor
Offer also open to liars. But not Illinois residents.
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Best travel gadgets 2014
A rundown of this year's must-have gizmos for commuters and jetsetters
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung Galaxy A5 and A3 arrive with metal bodies and Android 4.4 Kitkat
Mid-range smartphones look to sway buyers away from the iPhone 6
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

LG Display develops 'world's narrowest' smartphone bezel at 0.7mm
Features on a 5.3in Full HD LCD smartphone panel
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Android Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Andy Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Windows 7 OEM licence availability reaches zero day
From today, it's 8 or 0
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Microsoft Band vs FitBit Charge HR specs comparison
We pit the two latest fitness tracking wearables head to head
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay's Svartholm found guilty in Danish hacking case
Jury rejects remote access plea
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Liberty exposes secret links between GCHQ and the NSA
Papers prove private access deal
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung closes in on Apple's iPad with 18.3 percent of global tablet market
Firm sees a 5.6 percent rise in sales in the third quarter
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Material makeover meets many Android apps as Lollipop launch looms
Plus new Bookmark Manager, and Google Now knows your bank balance
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

NewsBone.com
Suggest a feed to syndicate here, or check out what I'm doing over at freshtao.
~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

+ Slashdot ~ OSNews ~ BBCTechnology ~ O'ReillyNews ~ Wi-FiPlanet ~ CRN +
Tech - Linux/BSD - Apache - Security - Hardware - Gaming - Autos - World - Entertainment - About
Powered by mod_perl Powered by Pure Perl Valid XHTML
Tuesday, 20-Oct-2020 04:08:53 EDT you came from 3.237.61.235:57324