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Visa, Mastercard $30 Billion Fee Settlement in Peril
Visa's and Mastercard's proposed $30 billion antitrust settlement to limit credit and debit card fees for merchants is in peril, after a New York judge signaled she was preparing to reject the accord. From a report: U.S. District Judge Margo Brodie in Brooklyn told lawyers for the card networks and objectors at a hearing on Thursday that she will "likely not approve the settlement," according to court records. She plans to write an opinion explaining her decision and reasoning. Both card networks said they were disappointed. Mastercard called the settlement a "fair resolution" that gave businesses more flexibility in managing card transactions, and Visa called it an "appropriate resolution" to the nearly 19-year-old case.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Rent is Too Dang High in Cities: Skylines 2, So the Devs Nuked the Landlords
An anonymous reader shares a report: City building simulations are not real life. They can be helpful teaching tools, but they abstract away many of the real issues in changing communities. And yet, sometimes a game like Cities: Skylines 2 (C:S2) will present an issue that's just too timely and relevant to ignore. Such is the case with "Economy 2.0," a big update to the beleaguered yet continually in-development game, due to arrive within the next week or so. The first and most important thing it tackles is the persistent issue of "High Rent," something that's bothering the in-game citizens ("cims" among fans), C:S2 players, and nearly every human living in the United States and many other places. C:S2 has solutions to high rent, at least for their virtual citizens. They removed the "virtual landlord" that takes in rent, so now a building's upkeep is evenly split among renters. There's a new formula for calculating rent, one that evokes a kind of elegant mathematical certainty none of us will ever see: "Rent = (LandValue + (ZoneType * Building Level)) * LotSize * SpaceMultiplier"
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

The Stanford Internet Observatory is Being Dismantled
An anonymous reader shares a report: After five years of pioneering research into the abuse of social platforms, the Stanford Internet Observatory is winding down. Its founding director, Alex Stamos, left his position in November. Renee DiResta, its research director, left last week after her contract was not renewed. One other staff member's contract expired this month, while others have been told to look for jobs elsewhere, sources say. Some members of the eight-person team might find other jobs at Stanford, and it's possible that the university will retain the Stanford Internet Observatory branding, according to sources familiar with the matter. But the lab will not conduct research into the 2024 election or other elections in the future.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

London Hospitals Knew of Cyber Vulnerabilities Years Before Hack
A group of London hospitals struggling to contain the fallout from a cyberattack against a critical supplier had known for years about weaknesses that left them vulnerable to hacks, Bloomberg News reported Friday, citing internal documents. From the report: The Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, which runs five major hospitals in the London area, has failed to meet the UK health service's data security standards in recent years and acknowledged as recently as April that 'cybersecurity remained a high risk" to its operations, according to publicly available documents that outline board of directors' meetings. In January, the board of directors raised questions about the security of digital links between hospital computer systems and those of third-party companies. Hackers last week brought down the trust's pathology services provider, Synnovis, with severe knock-on effects at hospitals. Doctors have, among other things, been forced to delay medical operations, postpone blood tests and resort to handwritten records. The attack has disrupted blood services so drastically that medical facilities are asking the public for donations, and one hospital is calling on its own staff to contribute. The April report proposed an audit to identify where improvements could be made. It's not clear if improvements took place before the hack on June 3, or whether the vulnerabilities identified in the board of directors' reports -- which include dated IT systems and hardware devices -- had any bearing on the ransomware infection at Synnovis.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Clearview AI Used Your Face. Now You May Get a Stake in the Company.
A facial recognition start-up, accused of invasion of privacy in a class-action lawsuit, has agreed to a settlement, with a twist: Rather than cash payments, it would give a 23 percent stake in the company to Americans whose faces are in its database. From a report: Clearview AI, which is based in New York, scraped billions of photos from the web and social media sites like Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram to build a facial recognition app used by thousands of police departments, the Department of Homeland Security and the F.B.I. After The New York Times revealed the company's existence in 2020, lawsuits were filed across the country. They were consolidated in federal court in Chicago as a class action. The litigation has proved costly for Clearview AI, which would most likely go bankrupt before the case made it to trial, according to court documents. The company and those who sued it were "trapped together on a sinking ship," lawyers for the plaintiffs wrote in a court filing proposing the settlement. "These realities led the sides to seek a creative solution by obtaining for the class a percentage of the value Clearview could achieve in the future," added the lawyers, from Loevy + Loevy in Chicago. Anyone in the United States who has a photo of himself or herself posted publicly online -- so almost everybody -- could be considered a member of the class. The settlement would collectively give the members a 23 percent stake in Clearview AI, which is valued at $225 million, according to court filings. (Twenty-three percent of the company's current value would be about $52 million.) If the company goes public or is acquired, those who had submitted a claim form would get a cut of the proceeds. Alternatively, the class could sell its stake. Or the class could opt, after two years, to collect 17 percent of Clearview's revenue, which it would be required to set aside.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Germany Sees Company Bankruptcies Soar
Germany's Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) on Friday said 5,209 companies filed for bankruptcy in Germany in the first three months of 2024 -- with the trend expected to continue. From a report: Experts think the number of corporate insolvencies in Germany will increase to about 20,000 cases this year as part of a longer-term pattern. The latest figure means corporate insolvencies are up 26.5% compared with the first quarter of 2023. They are also 11.2% more than in the first quarter of 2020 when 4,683 corporate insolvencies were filed before the COVID-19 pandemic had its full impact. The coronavirus pandemic period itself saw special, temporary regulations introduced and low insolvency rates. The transport and warehousing sector accounted for most insolvencies per 10,000 companies, with 29.6 cases at the start of 2024. This was followed by the construction industry with 23.5 cases, and other economic services such as employment agencies on 23 cases. Manufacturing saw 20.3 insolvencies per 10,000 companies. Local courts estimated the creditors' claims from the corporate insolvencies until the end of March was about $12.07 billion compared with $7.16 billion last year. There were also 17,478 consumer bankruptcies in the first quarter of 2024 â" an increase of 4.8% compared to the period in 2023.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

NASA Accidentally Broadcasts Simulation of Distressed Astronauts On ISS
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Reuters: NASA accidentally broadcast a simulation of astronauts being treated for decompression sickness on the International Space Station (ISS) on Wednesday, prompting speculation of an emergency in posts on social media. About 5:28 p.m. U.S. Central Time (2228 GMT), The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) live YouTube channel broadcast audio that indicated a crew member was experiencing the effects of decompression sickness (DCS), NASA said on its official ISS X account. A female voice asks crew members to "get commander back in his suit", check his pulse and provide him with oxygen, later saying his prognosis was "tenuous", according to copies of the audio posted on social media. NASA did not verify the recordings or republish the audio. Several space enthusiasts posted a link to the audio on X with warnings that there was a serious emergency on the ISS. "This audio was inadvertently misrouted from an ongoing simulation where crew members and ground teams train for various scenarios in space and is not related to a real emergency," the ISS account post said. "There is no emergency situation going on aboard the International Space Station," it added. Crew members on the ISS were in their sleep period at the time of the audio broadcast as they prepared for a spacewalk at 8 a.m. EDT on Thursday, the ISS post said. NASA's ISS YouTube channel -- at the time the audio was accidentally broadcast -- now shows an error message saying the feed has been interrupted.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Wild New Study Suggests Gravity Can Exist Without Mass
A new study by astrophysicist Richard Lieu suggests that gravity can exist without mass, proposing thin, shell-like layers of 'topological defects' as an alternative to dark matter for explaining the gravitational binding of galaxies. This theory posits that these defects create a gravitational force without detectable mass, potentially eliminating the need for dark matter in current cosmological models. Clare Watson reports via ScienceAlert: Lieu started out trying to find another solution to the Einstein field equations, which relate the curvature of space-time to the presence of matter within it. As Einstein described in his 1915 theory of general relativity, space-time warps around bundles of matter and streams of radiation in the Universe, depending on their energy and momentum. That energy is, of course, related to mass in Einstein's famous equation: E=mc2. So an object's mass is linked to its energy, which bends space-time -- and this curvature of space-time is what Einstein described as gravity, a notch more sophisticated than Newton's 17th-century approximation of gravity as a force between two objects with mass. In other words, gravity seems inextricably linked to mass. Not so, posits Lieu. In his workings, Lieu set about solving a simplified version of the Einstein field equations that allows for a finite gravitation force in the absence of any detectable mass. He says his efforts were "driven by my frustration with the status quo, namely the notion of dark matter's existence despite the lack of any direct evidence for a whole century." Lieu's solution consists of shell-shaped topological defects that might occur in very compact regions of space with a very high density of matter. These sets of concentric shells contain a thin layer of positive mass tucked inside an outer layer of negative mass. The two masses cancel each other out, so the total mass of the two layers is exactly zero. But when a star lies on this shell, it experiences a large gravitational force dragging it towards the center of the shell. "The contention of my paper is that at least the shells it posits are massless," Lieu says. If those contentious suggestions bear any weight, "there is then no need to perpetuate this seemingly endless search for dark matter," Lieu adds. The next question, then, is how to possibly confirm or refute the shells Lieu has proposed through observations. "The increasing frequency of sightings of ring and shell-like formation of galaxies in the Universe lends evidence to the type of source being proposed here," Lieu writes in his paper. Although he admits that his proposed solution is "highly suggestive" and cannot alone discredit the dark matter hypothesis. "It could be an interesting mathematical exercise at best," Lieu concludes. "But it is the first [mathematical] proof that gravity can exist without mass." The study has been published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

FAA is Investigating New Incident Involving a Boeing 737 Max 8 Jet in Midair
New submitter wgoodman writes: A Boeing 737 Max 8 jet experienced a rare but potentially serious problem recently known as a Dutch roll before landing safely. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the cause of the incident during a Southwest Airlines flight last month. Less than an hour after taking off from Phoenix on May 25th, the plane experienced an uncontrolled side-to-side yawing motion known as a Dutch roll while cruising at 32,000 feet. The pilots of Southwest flight 746 were able to regain control and the plane landed safely in Oakland, according to a preliminary report from the FAA. [...] The Boeing 737 Max 8 jet involved in the Dutch roll incident is less than two years old. According to the FAA, a post-flight inspection revealed damage to a backup power control unit, known as a PCU. That system controls rudder movements on the plane's tail. The plane remained in Oakland until June 6th, when it flew to Everett, Wash., where one of Southwest's maintenance vendors is based. Boeing has been working to rebuild the trust of federal regulators and the flying public since a pair of Boeing 737 Max 8 jets crashed in 2018 and 2019, killing 346 people. Earlier versions of the 737 were involved in several accidents and crashes during the 1990s that were ultimately blamed on problems with the tail rudder.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Microsoft Postpones Windows Recall After Major Backlash
In an unprecedented move, Microsoft has announced that its big Copilot+ PC initiative that was unveiled last month will launch without its headlining "Windows Recall" AI feature next week on June 18. From a report: The feature, which captures snapshots of your screen every few seconds, was revealed to store sensitive user data in an unencrypted state, raising serious concerns among security researchers and experts. Last week, Microsoft addressed these concerns by announcing that it would make changes to Windows Recall to ensure the feature handles data securely on device. At that time, the company insisted that Windows Recall would launch alongside Copilot+ PCs on June 18, with an update being made available at launch to address the concerns with Windows Recall. Now, Microsoft is saying Windows Recall will launch at a later date, beyond the general availability of Copilot+ PCs. This means these new devices will be missing their headlining AI feature at launch, as Windows Recall is now delayed indefinitely. The company says Windows Recall will be added in a future Windows update, but has not given a timeframe for when this will be. Further reading: 'Microsoft Has Lost Trust With Its Users and Windows Recall is the Straw That Broke the Camel's Back' Windows 11's New Recall Feature Has Been Cracked To Run On Unsupported Hardware Is the New 'Recall' Feature in Windows a Security and Privacy Nightmare? Mozilla Says It's Concerned About Windows Recall.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

A Growing Number of Americans Are Getting Their News From TikTok
According to a new survey from the Pew Research Center, TikTok is the second most popular source of news for Americans after X, "though most TikTok users don't primarily think of the shortform video app as a news source," notes The Verge. The survey looked at how Facebook, Instagram, TikTok and X play a role in Americans' news diets. From the report: Among TikTok users, only 15 percent say keeping up with the news is a major reason they use the app. Still, 35 percent of those surveyed said they wouldn't have seen the news they get on TikTok elsewhere. And unlike other apps, the news users see on TikTok is just as likely to come from influencers or celebrities as it is from journalists -- and it's far more likely to come from total strangers. (Meanwhile, most Facebook and Instagram users say the news that pops up on their feeds is posted by friends, relatives, or other people they know; on X, users are more likely to see news posted by media outlets or reporters.)
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

OIN Expands Linux Patent Protection Yet Again (But Not To AI)
Steven Vaughan-Nichols reports via ZDNet: While Linux and open-source software (OSS) are no longer constantly under intellectual property (IP) attacks, the Open Invention Network (OIN) patent consortium still stands guard over its patents. Now, OIN, the largest patent non-aggression community, has expanded its protection once again by updating its Linux System definition. Covering more than just Linux, the Linux System definition also protects adjacent open-source technologies. In the past, protection was expanded to Android, Kubernetes, and OpenStack. The OIN accomplishes this by providing a shared defensive patent pool of over 3 million patents from over 3,900 community members. OIN members include Amazon, Google, Microsoft, and essentially all Linux-based companies. This latest update extends OIN's existing patent risk mitigation efforts to cloud-native computing and enterprise software. In the cloud computing realm, OIN has added patent coverage for projects such as Istio, Falco, Argo, Grafana, and Spire. For enterprise computing, packages such as Apache Atlas and Apache Solr -- used for data management and search at scale, respectively -- are now protected. The update also enhances patent protection for the Internet of Things (IoT), networking, and automotive technologies. OpenThread and packages such as agl-compositor and kukusa.val have been added to the Linux System definition. In the embedded systems space, OIN has supplemented its coverage of technologies like OpenEmbedded by adding the OpenAMP and Matter, the home IoT standard. OIN has included open hardware development tools such as Edalize, cocotb, Amaranth, and Migen, building upon its existing coverage of hardware design tools like Verilator and FuseSoc. Keith Bergelt, OIN's CEO, emphasized the importance of this update, stating, "Linux and other open-source software projects continue to accelerate the pace of innovation across a growing number of industries. By design, periodic expansion of OIN's Linux System definition enables OIN to keep pace with OSS's growth." [...] Looking ahead, Bergelt said, "We made this conscious decision not to include AI. It's so dynamic. We wait until we see what AI programs have significant usage and adoption levels." This is how the OIN has always worked. The consortium takes its time to ensure it extends its protection to projects that will be around for the long haul. The OIN practices patent non-aggression in core Linux and adjacent open-source technologies by cross-licensing their Linux System patents to one another on a royalty-free basis. When OIN signees are attacked because of their patents, the OIN can spring into action.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Google's Privacy Sandbox Accused of Misleading Chrome Browser Users
Richard Speed reports via The Register: Privacy campaigner noyb has filed a GDPR complaint regarding Google's Privacy Sandbox, alleging that turning on a "Privacy Feature" in the Chrome browser resulted in unwanted tracking by the US megacorp. The Privacy Sandbox API was introduced in 2023 as part of Google's grand plan to eliminate third-party tracking cookies. Rather than relying on those cookies, website developers can call the API to display ads matched to a user's interests. In the announcement, Google's VP of the Privacy Sandbox initiative called it "a significant step on the path towards a fundamentally more private web." However, according to noyb, the problem is that although Privacy Sandbox is advertised as an improvement over third-party tracking, that tracking doesn't go away. Instead, it is done within the browser by Google itself. To comply with the rules, Google needs informed consent from users, which is where issues start. Noyb wrote today: "Google's internal browser tracking was introduced to users via a pop-up that said 'turn on ad privacy feature' after opening the Chrome browser. In the European Union, users are given the choice to either 'Turn it on' or to say 'No thanks,' so to refuse consent." Users would be forgiven for thinking that 'turn on ad privacy feature' would protect them from tracking. However, what it actually does is turn on first-party tracking. Max Schrems, honorary chairman of noyb, claimed: "Google has simply lied to its users. People thought they were agreeing to a privacy feature, but were tricked into accepting Google's first-party ad tracking. "Consent has to be informed, transparent, and fair to be legal. Google has done the exact opposite." Noyb noted that Google had argued "choosing to click on 'Turn it on' would indeed be considered consent to tracking under Article 6(1)(a) of the GDPR."
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Amazon Says It'll Spend $230 Million On Generative AI Startups
An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Amazon says that it will commit up to $230 million to startups building generative AI-powered applications. The investment, roughly $80 million of which will fund Amazon's second AWS Generative AI Accelerator program, aims to position AWS as an attractive cloud infrastructure choice for startups developing generative AI models to power their products, apps and services. Much of the new tranche -- including the entire portion set aside for the accelerator program -- comes in the form of compute credits for AWS infrastructure, meaning that it can't be transferred to other cloud service providers like Google Cloud and Microsoft Azure. To sweeten the pot, Amazon is pledging that startups in this year's Generative AI Accelerator cohort will gain access to experts and tech from Nvidia, the program's presenting partner. They will also be invited to join the Nvidia Inception program, which provides companies opportunities to connect with potential investors and additional consulting resources. The Generative AI Accelerator program has also grown substantially. Last year's cohort, which had 21 startups, received only up to $300,000 in AWS compute credits, amounting to around a combined $6.3 million investment. "With this new effort, we will help startups launch and scale world-class businesses, providing the building blocks they need to unleash new AI applications that will impact all facets of how the world learns, connects, and does business," Matt Wood, VP of AI products at AWS, said in a statement. Further reading: How Amazon Blew Alexa's Shot To Dominate AI
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Police Arrest Conti and LockBit Ransomware Crypter Specialist
The Ukraine cyber police, supported by information from the Dutch police, arrested a 28-year-old Russian man in Kyiv for aiding Conti and LockBit ransomware operations by making their malware undetectable and conducting at least one attack himself. He was arrested on April 18, 2024, as part of a global law enforcement operation known as "Operation Endgame," which took down various botnets and their main operators. "As the Conti ransomware group used some of those botnets for initial access on breached endpoints, evidence led investigators to the Russian hacker," reports BleepingComputer. From the report: The Ukrainian police reported that the arrested individual was a specialist in developing custom crypters for packing the ransomware payloads into what appeared as safe files, making them FUD (fully undetectable) to evade detection by the popular antivirus products. The police found that the man was selling his crypting services to both the Conti and LockBit cybercrime syndicates, helping them significantly increase their chances of success on breached networks. The Dutch police confirmed at least one case of the arrested individual orchestrating a ransomware attack in 2021, using a Conti payload, so he also operated as an affiliate for maximum profit. "As part of the pre-trial investigation, police, together with patrol officers of the special unit "TacTeam" of the TOR DPP battalion, conducted a search in Kyiv," reads the Ukraine police announcement. "Additionally, at the international request of law enforcement agencies in the Netherlands, a search was conducted in the Kharkiv region." [...] The suspect has already been charged with Part 5 of Article 361 of the Criminal Code of Ukraine (Unauthorized interference in the work of information, electronic communication, information and communication systems, electronic communication networks) and faces up to 15 years imprisonment.
Slashdot ~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

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~Created Fri Jun 14 13:27:15 2024

Canonical and DeepComputing announce new RISC-V laptop shipping with Ubuntu
Speaking of PCs that don’t use x86 chips, Canonical and DeepComputing today announced a new RISC-V laptop running Ubuntu, available for pre-order in a few days. It’s the successor to the DC-ROMA, which shipped last year. Adding to a long list of firsts, the new DC-ROMA laptop II is the first to feature SpacemiT’s SoC K1 – with its 8-cores RISC-V CPU running at up to 2.0GHz with 16GB of memory. This significantly doubled its overall performance and energy efficiency over the previous generation’s 4-cores SoC running at 1.5GHz. Moreover, SpacemiT’s SoC K1 is also the world’s first SoC to support RISC-V high performance computing RVA 22 Profile RVV 1.0 with 256 bit width, and to have powerful AI capabilities with its customised matrix operation instruction based on IME Group design principle!  This second-generation DC-ROMA RISC-V laptop also features an all-metal casing making it more durable, as well as improving heat dissipation and more on its premium class look and feel compared to previous generation. ↫ Canonical’s blog The DC-ROMA II is clearly aimed at developers, as it has what is essentially a GeekPort on the side of the laptop, to aid in porting and debugging software. Aside from that and the RISC-V processor, it’s a rather mid-range kind of device, and no pricing has been published yet so I’m not sure if this is something I could afford for an OSNews review. Once the preorders go live in a few days, we’ll know more. If you’d like to see this RISC-V laptop make an appearance on OSNews, let me know, and I’ll see what I can do.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

The Qualcomm Snapdragon X architecture deep dive: getting to know Oryon and Adreno X1
In the last 8 months Qualcomm has made a lot of interesting claims for their high-performance Windows-on-Arm SoC – many of which will be put to the test in the coming weeks. But beyond all the performance claims and bluster amidst what is shaping up to be a highly competitive environment for PC CPUs, there’s an even more fundamental question about the Snapdragon X that we’ve been dying to get to: how does it work? Ahead of next week’s launch, then, we’re finally getting the answer to that, as today Qualcomm is releasing their long-awaited architectural disclosure on the Snapdragon X SoC. This includes not only their new, custom Arm v8 “Oryon” CPU core, but also technical disclosures on their Adreno GPU, and the Hexagon NPU that backs their heavily-promoted AI capabilities. The company has made it clear in the past that the Snapdragon X is a serious, top-priority effort for the company – that they’re not just slapping together a Windows SoC from their existing IP blocks and calling it a day – so there’s a great deal of novel technology within the SoC. ↫ Ryan Smith at AnandTech I cannot wait until AnandTech can move beyond diving into information provided by Qualcomm, and can start doing their own incredibly in-depth benchmarks and research. Assuming the effort succeeds, the Snapdragon X line will most likely form the backbone of ARM PCs for years – if not decades – to come, meaning that when you and I go shopping for a new laptop, this chip will be the one heavily promoted by stores and outlets. How closely independent benchmarks line up with Qualcomm’s eight months of promises and cherry-picked benchmarks will also tell us a lot about how trustworthy the company will be about the performance of its chips going forward. In smartphones – where we mostly see Qualcomm today – performance simply doesn’t matter as much, but when you’re dealing with laptops, and in the future possibly even desktops, performance suddenly matters a lot more, and Qualcomm’s claims will be facing a level of scrutiny and detail I don’t think they’ve ever really had to deal with before. PC enthusiasts don’t mess around. If the Linux support turns out to be as solid as Qualcomm claims, and if the performance figures they’ve been putting out are verified by quality independent reviewers like the people at AnandTech, I honestly don’t think my next laptop will be using x86. I just hope weird companies like Chuwi will release a version of their MiniBook X with one a Qualcomm chip, because I’ll be damned if I go back to anything larger than 10″.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Exclusive: Mozilla reverses course, re-lists extensions it removed in Russia
Two days ago, I broke the news that Mozilla removed several Firefox extensions from the add-on store in Russia, after pressure from Russian censors. Mozilla provided me with an official statement, which seemed to highlight that the decision was not final, and it seems I was right – today, probably helped by the outcry our story caused, Mozilla has announced it’s reversing the decision. In a statement sent to me via email, an unnamed Mozilla spokesperson says: In alignment with our commitment to an open and accessible internet, Mozilla will reinstate previously restricted listings in Russia. Our initial decision to temporarily restrict these listings was made while we considered the regulatory environment in Russia and the potential risk to our community and staff. As outlined in our Manifesto, Mozilla’s core principles emphasise the importance of an internet that is a global public resource, open and accessible to all. Users should be free to customise and enhance their online experience through add-ons without undue restrictions. By reinstating these add-ons, we reaffirm our dedication to: – Openness: Promoting a free and open internet where users can shape their online experience.– Accessibility: Ensuring that the internet remains a public resource accessible to everyone, regardless of geographical location. We remain committed to supporting our users in Russia and worldwide and will continue to advocate for an open and accessible internet for all. ↫ Mozilla spokesperson via email I’m glad Mozilla reversed its decision, because giving in to a dictatorship never ends well – it starts with a few extensions today, but ends up with the kind of promotional tours for China that Tim Cook goes on regularly. Firefox is a browser that lives or dies by its community, and if that community is unhappy with the course of Mozilla or the decisions it makes, especially ones that touch on core values and human rights, it’s not going to end well for them. That being said, this does make me wonder what would’ve happened if the forum thread that started all this died in obscurity and never made its way to the media. Would Mozilla have made the same reversal?
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Chrome OS switching to the Android Linux kernel and related Android subsystems
Surprisingly quietly, in the middle of Apple’s WWDC, Google’s ChromeOS team has made a rather massive announcement that seems to be staying a bit under the radar. Google is announcing today that it is replacing many of ChromeOS’ current relatively standard Linux-based subsystems with the comparable subsystems from Android. To continue rolling out new Google AI features to users at a faster and even larger scale, we’ll be embracing portions of the Android stack, like the Android Linux kernel and Android frameworks, as part of the foundation of ChromeOS. We already have a strong history of collaboration, with Android apps available on ChromeOS and the start of unifying our Bluetooth stacks as of ChromeOS 122. ↫ Prajakta Gudadhe and Alexander Kuscher on the Chromium blog The benefits to Google here are obvious: instead of developing and maintaining two variants of the Linux kernel and various related subsystems, they now only have to focus on one, saving money and time. It will also make it easier for both platforms to benefit from new features and bugfixes, which should benefit users of both platforms quite a bit. As mentioned in the snippet, the first major subsystem in ChromeOS to be replaced by its Android counterpart is Bluetooth. ChromeOS was using the BlueZ Bluetooth stack, the same one used by most (all?) Linux distributions today, which was initially developed by Qualcomm, but has now switched over to using Fluoride, the one from Android. According to Google, Fluoride has a number of benefits over BlueZ. It runs almost entirely in userspace, as opposed to BlueZ, where more than 50% of the code resides in the kernel. In addition, Fluoride is written in Rust, and Google claims it has a simpler architecture, making it easier to perform testing. Google also highlights that Fluoride has a far larger userbase – i.e., all Android users – which also presents a number of benefits. Google performed internal tests to measure the improvements as a result from switching ChromeOS from BlueZ to Fluoride, and the test results speak for themselves – pairing is faster, pairing fails less often, and reconnecting an already paired device fails less often. With Bluetooth being a rather problematic technology to use, any improvements to the user experience are welcome. At the end of Google’s detailed blog post about the switch to Fluoride, the company notes that it intends for the project as whole – which is called Project Floss – to be a standalone open source project, capable of running on any Linux distribution. ↫ Russ Lindsay, Abhishek Pandit-Subedi, Alain Michaud, and Loic Wei Yu Neng on the chromeOS dev website We aspire to position Project Floss as a standalone open source project that can reach beyond the walls of Google’s own operating system in a way where we can maximize the overall value and agility of the larger Bluetooth ecosystem. We also intend to support the Linux community as a whole with the goal that Floss can easily run on most Linux distributions. If Fluoride can indeed deliver tangible, measurable benefits in Bluetooth performance on Linux desktops, I have no doubt quite a few distributions will be more than willing to switch over. Bluetooth is used a lot, and if Fedora, Ubuntu, Arch, and so on, can improve the Bluetooth experience by switching over, I’m pretty sure they will, or at least consider doing so.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Arm, Qualcomm legal battle seen disrupting AI-powered PC wave
The new Windows on ARM Copilot+ PC thing, running on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon X Elite and Pro chips, isn’t even out the door yet, and we’re already dealing with legal proceedings. But the main conversation among conference attendees was over how a contract dispute between Arm Holdings and Qualcomm, which work together to make the chips powering these new laptops, could abruptly halt the shipment of new PCs that industry leaders expect will make Microsoft and its partners billions of dollars. ↫ Max A. Cherney at Reuters The basic gist of the story is as follows. Qualcomm acquired a company named Nuvia, founded by former Apple processor engineers, in order to gain new technology to build its Snapdragon X Elite and Pro chips. Nuvia was planning on developing ARM chips for servers, but after the acquisition, Qualcomm changed their plans and repurposed their technology for use in laptops – the new X chips. ARM claims that Nuvia was only granted a license for server use, and not laptop use. Qualcomm, meanwhile, argued that it has a broad license to use ARM for pretty much anything, and as such, that any possible restrictions Nuvia had are irrelevant. While this all sounds like very rich corporations having a silly legal slapfight, it could have real consequences. If the legal case goes very, very wrong for Qualcomm, it could halt the sale of devices powered by the Snapdragon X chips well before they’re even shipping. I doubt it’ll get that far – it rarely does, and there’s some big names and big reputations at play here – but it does highlight the absurdity of how the ARM ecosystem works. Speaking of the ARM ecosystem, Qualcomm isn’t the only ARM chip makers dying to break into the PC market. Qualcomm currently has a weird exclusivity agreement with Microsoft where it’s the only ARM chip supplier for PCs, but that agreement is running out soon. Another player that’s ready to storm this market once that happens is MediaTek, who is also developing a chip geared towards Microsoft’s Copilot+ specifications, with a release target of 2025. Let’s hope MediaTek will be as forthcoming with Linux support as Qualcomm surprisingly has been, but I have my sincerest doubt.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Linus Torvalds: extensible scheduler “sched_ext” in Linux 6.11
The extensible scheduler “sched_ext” code has proven quite versatile for opening up better Linux gaming performance, more quickly prototyping new scheduler changes, Ubuntu/Canonical has been evaluating it for pursuing a more micro-kernel like design, and many other interesting approaches with it. Yet it’s remained out of tree but that is now changing with the upcoming Linux 6.11 cycle. Linus Torvalds as the benevolent dictator for life “BDFL” of the Linux kernel announced he intends to merge the sched_ext patches for Linux 6.11 even though there has been some objections by other kernel developers. Torvalds feels the sched_ext code is ready enough and provides real value to the mainline Linux kernel. It’s not worth dragging out sched_ext continuing to be out-of-tree. ↫ Michael Larabel at Phoronix I haven’t felt the need to mess around with the Linux scheduler in a long, long time – I have some vague memories of perhaps well over a decade ago where opting for a different scheduler could lead to better desktop-focused performance characteristics, but the details in my brain are so fuzzy that it may just be a fabricated or confabulated memory.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

OpenBSD extreme privacy setup
This is an attempt to turn OpenBSD into a Whonix or Tails alternative, although if you really need that level of privacy, use a system from this list and not the present guide. It is easy to spot OpenBSD using network fingerprinting, this can not be defeated, you can not hide the fact you use OpenBSD to network operators. I did this guide as a challenge for fun, but I also know some users have a use for this level of privacy. ↫ Solène Rapenne Written by OpenBSD developer Solène Rapenne, so you’re probably not going to find a guide written by anyone more knowledgeable.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Microsoft pulls release preview build of Windows 11 24H2 after Recall controversy
Microsoft recently announced some big changes to the Recall feature in Windows, and now it’s pulled the Release Preview version which contained Recall entirely. It’s likely not a coincidence that Microsoft also quietly pulled the build of the Windows 11 24H2 update that it had been testing in its Release Preview channel for Windows Insiders. It’s not unheard of for Microsoft to stop distributing a beta build of Windows after releasing it, but the Release Preview channel is typically the last stop for a Windows update before a wider release. ↫ Andrew Cunningham at Ars Technica The company doesn’t actually mention why the release was pulled, but the reason is pretty obvious if you connect the dots. I’m at least glad Microsoft is taking the complaints seriously, and while I don’t personally think Recall is a good idea, if a user gives their consent and uses it knowingly and willingly, I don’t see any problems with it.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Under pressure from Russian censors, Mozilla removes anti-censorship extensions
A few days ago, I was pointed to a post on the Mozilla forums, in which developers of Firefox extensions designed to circumvent Russian censorship were surprised to find that their extensions were suddenly no longer available within Russia. The extension developers and other users in the thread were obviously not amused, and since they had received no warning or any other form of communication from Mozilla, they were left in the dark as to what was going on. I did a journalism and contacted Mozilla directly, and inquired about the situation. Within less than 24 hours Mozilla got back to me with an official statement, attributed to an unnamed Mozilla spokesperson: Following recent regulatory changes in Russia, we received persistent requests from Roskomnadzor demanding that five add-ons be removed from the Mozilla add-on store. After careful consideration, we’ve temporarily restricted their availability within Russia. Recognizing the implications of these actions, we are closely evaluating our next steps while keeping in mind our local community. ↫ Mozilla spokesperson via email I and most people I talked to already suspected this was the case, and considering Russia is a totalitarian dictatorship, it’s not particularly surprising it would go after browser extensions that allow people to circumvent state censorship. Other totalitarian dictatorships like China employ similar, often far more sophisticated methods of state control and censorship, too, so it’s right in line with expectations. I would say that I’m surprised Mozilla gave in, but at the same time, it’s highly likely resisting would lead to massive fines and possible arrests of any Mozilla employees or contributors living in Russia, if any such people exist, and I can understand a non-profit like Mozilla not having the means to effectively stand up against the Russian government. That being said, Mozilla’s official statement seems to imply they’re still in the middle of their full decision-making process regarding this issue, so other options may still be on the table, and I think it’s prudent to give Mozilla some more time to deal with this situation. Regardless, this decision is affecting real people inside Russia, and I’m sure if you’re using tools like these inside a totalitarian dictatorship, you’re probably not too fond of said dictatorship. Losing access to these Firefox extensions through the official add-store will be a blow to their human rights, so let’s hope the source code and ‘sideloaded’ versions of these extensions remain available for them to use instead.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Apple WWDC 2024: the 13 biggest announcements
Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference keynote has come to a close — and the company had a whole lot to share. We got our first look at the AI features coming to Apple’s devices and some major updates across the company’s operating systems. If you missed out on watching the keynote live, we’ve gathered all the biggest announcements that you can check out below. ↫ Emma Roth at The Verge Most of the stuff Apple announced aren’t particularly interesting – a lot of catch-up stuff that has become emblematic of companies like Google, Apple, and Microsoft when it comes to their operating systems. The one thing that did stand out is Apple’s approach to offloading machine learning requests to the cloud when they are too difficult to handle on device. They’ve developed a new way of doing this, using servers with Apple’s own M chips, which is pretty cool and harkens back the days of the Xserve. In short, these server are using the same kind of techniques to encrypt and secure data on iPhones, but now to encrypt and secure the data coming in for offloaded machine learning requests. The root of trust for Private Cloud Compute is our compute node: custom-built server hardware that brings the power and security of Apple silicon to the data center, with the same hardware security technologies used in iPhone, including the Secure Enclave and Secure Boot. We paired this hardware with a new operating system: a hardened subset of the foundations of iOS and macOS tailored to support Large Language Model (LLM) inference workloads while presenting an extremely narrow attack surface. This allows us to take advantage of iOS security technologies such as Code Signing and sandboxing. ↫ Apple’s security research blog Apple also provided some insight into where its training data is coming from, and it claims it’s only using licensed data and “publicly available data collected by our web-crawler”. The words “licensed” and “publicly available” are doing a lot of heavy lifting here, and I’m not entirely sure what definitions of those terms Apple is using. There are enough people out there who feel every piece of data – whether under copyright, available under an open source license, or whatever – is fair, legal game for ML training, so who knows what Apple is using based on these statements alone. From Apple’s presentations yesterday, as well as any later statements, it’s also not clear when machine learning requests get offloaded in the first place. Apple states they try to run as much as possible on-device, and will offload when needed, but the conditions under which such offloading happens are nebulous and unclear, making it hard for users to know what’s going to happen when they use Apple’s new machine learning features.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Tuxedo showcases prototype Linux laptop with Snapdragon X Elite
I’ve long been waiting for a powerful ARM laptop that can run Linux comfortably, and it seems that with Qualcomm’s new Snapdragon X Elite SoC, that’s finally going to happen. We talked earlier about how for once, Qualcomm is taking Linux support for their new laptop-focused processors very seriously, and that promise and associated effort is paying dividend. Tuxedo, a popular Linux OEM from Germany, has announced it’s working on a laptop with the Snapdragon X Elite chip, and they showed off a working prototype at Computex in Taiwan. We have been working with a first prototype for some time, which will soon be replaced by a second one. The development is still in the alpha stage, as some drivers are still missing, which will hopefully be available with the next two kernel versions. It is quite conceivable that an ARM notebook from TUXEDO will be under your Christmas tree in 2024. However, there are still too many pieces of the hardware, software and delivery capability puzzle missing to even begin to set a release date. TUXEDO for ARM will come, but we don’t yet know exactly when. ↫ Tuxedo’s website Their timeline of more Qualcomm drivers making it into the next two kernel versions lines up with Qualcomm’s own timeline, so it seems we’re mostly just waiting for them to finish their Linux drivers and add them to the kernel. This is quite exciting, and a much better option for Linux users than buying a Windows version of an X Elite or Pro laptop and hoping for the best.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

NetBSD 10 with disk encryption on UEFI, and NetBSD 10 on the Pinebook Pro
NetBSD 10 was released recently, so a lot of people are experimenting with it and writing down their thoughts. I’ve got two of those for you today, to help you in case you, too, want to install NetBSD 10 and play around with, or just use, it. First, what if you want to install NetBSD 10 on a UEFI system, but with full disk encryption in case your device gets stolen? It turns out there are countless guides for installing with full-disk encryption on MBR-based systems, but once you use UEFI – as you should be – things get a lot more complicated. The NetBSD installer is apparently rather basic, and a better solution is to drop to a shell and install NetBSD that way instead, and even then, full disk encryption with UEFI is actually not possible, as it seems the root file system – where the operating system itself resides – cannot be encrypted. The restriction is in the root file-system. It needs to be in plain-text and in a regular partition. It seems to me that rootfs in CGD or LVM is not well supported. ↫ vsis.online This seems like something the NetBSD team may need to take a look at, since full disk encryption should be an easy option to choose, even, or especially in 2024, on UEFI systems. Such encryption is easily achieved on Linux or Windows systems, and it seems odd to me that NetBSD is lagging behind a bit here. In the meantime, the linked guide will be a good jumping-off point for those of you interested in going a similar route. The second article I want to highlight concerns NetBSD 10 on the Pinebook Pro, the inexpensive ARM laptop that normally ships with Linux. It turns out there’s a NetBSD 10 image for this device, so installation is quite a bit more straightforward than the more exotic setup I mentioned earlier. It seems most of the hardware works quite well out of the box, with the inly exception being the on-board Wi-Fi, which the author addressed with a USB W-Fi dongle. Other than that, NetBSD is running well on the Pinebook Pro for the author, which is great to read since that makes this cheap device a great starting point for people interested in running NetBSD.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Void Linux on ZFS
Last night, I ran through the ZFSBootMenu documentation guide for Void and followed it both on a VM and then on an external SATA HDD plugged through a USB case, taking some notes and getting a general idea of the process. The Void installer does not support ZFS out of the box, so the Void Handbook itself recommends the ZFSBootMenu documentation before its own (a manual chroot installation) when it comes to doing a ZFS-on-root install. This guide from ZFSBootMenu is what we’ll be following throughout this post. ↫ Juno Takano There’s a ton of good stuff in this lengthy, detailed, and helpful blog post. First, it covers Void Linux, which is one of the best signifiers of good taste, classy style, and generally being a good person. Void is not necessarily underappreciated – it gets a lot of mentions in the right places – but I do feel there are a lot more people for whom Void Linux would be a perfect fit but who don’t yet know about it. So, time for a very short introduction. Void Linux is distribution with its own unique and very user-friendly package manager that’s an absolute joy to use. Unlike many other custom, more obscure package formats, the Void repositories are vast, generally some of the most up-to-date, and you’ll be hard-pressed to be asking for some piece of software that isn’t packaged. Void eschews systemd in favour of runit, and while I personally have no issues with systemd, diversity is always welcome and runit is, in line with everything else Void, easy to grasp and use. Lastly, while Void also comes in a GNU libc flavour, it feels like the “real” Void Linux is the one using musl. Second is a tool I had never heard of: ZFSBootMenu. The name is rather self-explanatory, but in slightly more detail: it’s a self-contained small Linux-based bootloader that detects any Linux kernels and initramfs images on ZFS file systems, which can then be launched using kexec. It makes running Linux on ZFS quite a bit easier, especially for systems that don’t over ZFS as an option during installation, like, in this case, Void Linux. And that’s what the linked post is actually about: setting up a root-on-ZFS Void EFI installation. It’s a great companion article for anyone trying something similar.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Reverse-engineering MenuetOS 64: primary boot loader
Now that we have the MenuetOS 64 disk image file (M6414490.IMG), it is time to analyze! We will analyze the image file both statically and dynamically. Static analysis is reading and analyzing code without running it, whereas dynamic analysis is running the code and watching how it changes registers and memory during execution. Each analysis mode compliments the other; there are some things that can only be discerned through code execution, like register values or stack layout at a specific point in time during execution. Static analysis is useful for “filling in the blanks” when executing code to understand what the code should do next (or just did). Since MenuetOS 64 is written in Intel x64 assembly, our static analysis will consist of memory mapped disassembly in Ghidra. After reading this post, readers should understand how to launch a MenuetOS 64 virtual machine using QEMU as well as how to attach a debugger (gdb) to QEMU in order to debug while code is executing. Also, readers should understand how MenuetOS 64 begins the boot process as control of execution is passed to MenuetOS 64 code from the virtualization firmware. ↫ Nicholas Starke This is an old post – from late 2022 – but a great read nonetheless, and considering MenuetOS doesn’t change very much from year to year, it’s still mostly relevant.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

What is PID 0?
The very short version: Unix PIDs do start at 0! PID 0 just isn’t shown to userspace through traditional APIs. PID 0 starts the kernel, then retires to a quiet life of helping a bit with process scheduling and power management. Also the entire web is mostly wrong about PID 0, because of one sentence on Wikipedia from 16 years ago. There’s a slightly longer short version right at the end, or you can stick with me for the extremely long middle bit! But surely you could just google what PID 0 is, right? Why am I even publishing this? ↫ David Anderson What a great read. Just great.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Adobe terms clarified: will never own your work, or use it for AI training
Adobe Creative Cloud users opened their apps yesterday to find that they were forced to agree to new terms, which included some frightening-sounding language. It seemed to suggest Adobe was claiming rights over their work. Worse, there was no way to continue using the apps, to request support to clarify the terms, or even uninstall the apps, without agreeing to the terms. ↫ Ben Lovejoy at 9To5Mac Of course users were going to revolt. Even without the scary-sounding language, locking people out of their applications unless they agree to new terms is a terrible dark pattern, and something a lot of enterprise customers certainly aren’t going to be particularly happy about. I’ve never worked an office job, so how does stuff like this normally go? I’m assuming employees aren’t allowed to just accept new licensing terms from Adobe or whatever on their office computers? In response to the backlash, Adobe came out and said in a statement that it does not intend to claim ownership over anyone’s work, and that it’s not going to train its ML models on customers’ work either. The company states that to train its Firefly ML model, it only uses content it has properly licensed for it, as well as public domain content. Assuming Adobe is telling the truth, it seems the company at least understands the concept of consent, which is good news, and a breath of fresh air compared to crooks like OpenAI or GitHub. Content used for training ML models should be properly licensed for it, and consent should be properly obtained from rightsholders, and taking Adobe at their word, it seems that’s exactly what they’re doing. Regardless, the backlash illustrates once again just how – rightfully – weary people are of machine learning, and how their works might be illegally appropriated to train such models.
OSnews ~Created Fri Jun 14 12:06:12 2024

Silicon Valley's trial of the century
A look at the Theranos trial and the evidence that led to Elizabeth Holmes being found guilty of fraud.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Asus recalls product after users 'smell smoke'
The computer company has had a "few" complaints and warned some 2021 models could be affected.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Elizabeth Holmes: Theranos founder convicted of fraud
The Silicon Valley ex-CEO faces a lengthy term in prison for defrauding investors.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Why BlackBerry held the tiny keys to my heart
The classic smartphone's life comes to an end on 4 January as the firm switches off support.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Elon Musk: Tesla criticised after opening Xinjiang showroom
The world's most valuable car maker opened the new showroom in the city of Urumqi on New Year's Eve.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Apple becomes first firm to hit $3tn market value
The firm's value more than doubled during the pandemic as people bought more gadgets during lockdowns.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Top US phone firms agree delay of 5G rollout
The two-week delay requested by transportation and aviation authorities was initially rejected.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Is there a better way to make new resolutions stick?
There are lots of apps that promise to make you healthier and happier but are they any good?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Marjorie Taylor Greene: Twitter bans congresswoman over Covid misinformation
The congresswoman was suspended after tweeting falsely about high levels of vaccine related deaths.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Milton Keynes to hold large-scale driverless car trial
The council believes driverless vehicles could be commonplace in the town within two years.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Year in tech: The stories making headlines in 2021
From the metaverse to NFTs and everything in-between, what's made the news in tech this year?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

NHS Covid app sends record number of 'pings'
The alerts ask people to test or self-isolate after contact with someone who had a positive result.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Can fitness apps be as effective as a personal trainer?
A growing number of fitness apps use artificial intelligence software to personalise workouts.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Tesla to recall 475,000 cars in the US
The number of cars being recalled is nearly equivalent to the firm's global deliveries last year.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

China ride-hailing giant Didi sees losses deepen after crackdown
This month the company announced that it would move its share listing from New York to Hong Kong.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

TikTok moderator sues over 'psychological trauma'
Candie Frazier says her mental health suffered after watching "extreme and graphic" video content.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Elon Musk rejects claims that his satellites are hogging space
His comments come after China complained to the United Nations about his internet satellite project.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

What is artificial intelligence and why is it important?
Many recent big advances in tech have one key thing at the heart of then: artificial intelligence.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

What are algorithms and how do they work?
A huge amount of our lives is influenced by algorithms. Here's how they work.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

What are quantum computers and what are they used for?
Companies around the world are racing to create a new generation of computers.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

How do you turn off the internet?
How easy would it be for a government to block one of the biggest sources of news and information?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Bitcoin: What are crypto-currencies?
Fans of crypto-currencies say they are the future of money - but at what cost?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

The rise and fall of Elizabeth Holmes
The founder of the once promising start-up Theranos has been found guilty of fraud. What went wrong?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Games to look out for in 2022
The BBC's gaming reporter Steffan Powell runs through what to look out for over the coming year.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

What is the metaverse?
From virtual versions of ourselves to augmented reality, we break down what the metaverse is.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

How to read your weather app
What you need to know about weather forecasts on your phone
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Virtual reality worship: What carols at home looks like this Christmas
The Church of England has released a series of virtual reality carols
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Elizabeth Holmes: Has the Theranos scandal changed Silicon Valley?
Could a Theranos scandal happen again or has Silicon Valley learnt its lesson?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Miners experiment with hydrogen to power giant trucks
Anglo American is testing a hydrogen-powered giant truck in a bid to make its business greener.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

The robot chefs that can cook your Christmas dinner
If you fancy not having to do the cooking on 25 December then a robotic chef might be the solution.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Tech trends 2022: Starships and missing chips
From giant rockets to new ways to heat your home, a look at the technology that will emerge in 2022.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

How Russia tries to censor Western social media
Western social media companies face huge fines as Russia pressures them to remove content it objects to.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Console shortages: Why can't I buy the Xbox Series X or PlayStation 5?
Chinese power cuts, the pandemic and other reasons you can't get your hands on gaming hardware.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

How vending machines are making life better for Kenyans
By thinking small vending machine firms are delivering more affordable products for Kenyan shoppers.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Tue Jan 4 17:57:42 2022

Webcast: Navigating QuickBooks 2013 - Mar 19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Katie Cunningham Lynn Root at Let's Learn Python at PyCon - Mar 13-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Being Productive with Windows 8 - Mar 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

O'Reilly Strata Conference - Feb 26-28 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Hybrid Apps with PhoneGap - Feb 21 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Rich, High Performance Tools for Practical Data Analysis - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Thinking Big Together: Driving the Future of Data Science - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Christopher Schmitt at In Control Orlando 2013 Mobile and Web Design Conference - Feb 17-19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing for Data-driven Organizations - Feb 14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Tools of Change for Publishing Conference (TOC) - Feb 12-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: How Lean Startups Define, Measure, and Communicate Progress - Feb 8 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Using Windows XP in a Windows 8 Virtual Machine - Feb 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Bandit Algorithms for the Web - Feb 5 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: UX Design for Digital Books: Creating Engaging Digital Reading Experiences - Feb 1 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing And Creating A Social Book App Using Open-source Technologies - Jan 29 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Core Data

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

EPUB 3 Best Practices

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Windows Server 2012 Inside Out

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Secrets of Product Management - Jan 24 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: So you got a Raspberry Pi for the Holidays - Jan 23 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Data Warfare - Jan 22 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: 10 Steps to Product/Market Fit - Jan 18 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Principles of Mobile Interface Design - Jan 17 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

The Book of GIMP

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: HTML5 for Mobile Devices - Jan 16 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

NewsBone.com
Suggest a feed to syndicate here, or check out what I'm doing over at freshtao.
~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Securing the Black Hat Wi-Fi Network With Aruba's Cloud
Aruba uses new technology to minimize the on-site equipment needed to secure one of the most hostile conference environments in America.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Is Cisco's WPA Migration Mode Leaving Wi-Fi Users at Risk?
Researchers at Black Hat this week warn about a potential threat in Cisco 1200-series wireless access points, but the enterprise networking giant downplays the danger.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Intel Denies Any Reduction in WiMAX Commitment
The chip giant was forced to respond after Asian publication reported the dissolution of Intel's WiMAX promotional group.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Aerohive Revamps Free Online Wi-Fi Planner
With an update to its Wi-Fi planning tool, Aerohive has made it easier for networkers to plan for Wi-Fi deployments. Enterprise Networking Planet's review of the revamped tool says improved report output, a streamlined workflow and better interface make the tool accessible to more people while providing better results.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Meru Expands WLAN Service Assurance Portfolio
Spectrum analysis, security, and monitoring products increase reliability and cut TCO for Meru Virtual Cell WLANs.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Veriwave's WaveDeploy Raises the Bar on WLAN Assessment
Site assessment tool maps per-client application performance for what-if analysis, client certification, and SLA validation.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Google Apologizes for Snaring Wi-Fi Data
Google says it didn't mean to gather unsecured data as its cars roamed the streets putting together Street View images, but the search company learned it was doing just that as a result of a request for an audit from a German privacy authority.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

4G On the Brink of Massive Growth
Whether it's WiMAX or LTE, 4G is going to be growing in the next few years. While the two protocols coexist right now, what's the future going to hold?
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

SiBeam Introduces Wireless Video Streaming Chipset
By combining support two high-speed wireless protocols, the company hopes to usher in new, cheaper forms of high-definition wireless streaming.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Wi-Fi 2015: Where Is Wireless Networking Going?
With more than 1 billion devices on the market and 802.11n now standardized, what's next for the networking technology? A panel of networking experts at Interop peers into the crystal ball.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

FCC chief set for panto horse net neutrality settlement
Oh no he isn't
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Outlook for Mac update arrives with new Word and Excel apps coming next year
But Microsoft recommends deleting Office for Mac 2011 before using it
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Facebook takes to Tor for weird sort of anonymous socialising
It's anonymous, but everyone can see it and it's a bit weird
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Hungary scraps internet tax plans in wake of mass protests
Neelie Kroes welcomes the decision
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm sentenced for CSC hack
Three and a half years for computer hacking
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Amazon beats off Apple in US tablet satisfaction standings
That's one in the i for the handheld market
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Nexus 6 destined to flop owing to high price and pre-order disaster
Google demonstrates how not to release a smartphone
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Drupal flaw could hit millions of sites
Users of web content management system urged to close backdoor access
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

China will move to Linux by 2020 in 'de-Windowsifying' process
Chinese government advisor invents new word
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

iPhone 6 Plus review
Phablet is a welcome addition to Apple smartphone range
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Yosemite users reporting problems with WiFi connectivity
Others bemoan Bluetooth and Handoff issues
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Sony posts huge Q3 loss as smartphone sales continue to slide
But PS4 sales are on the up
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Google must pay Canadian woman over Street View cleavage boobie
Dcolletage will not help anyone find their way anywhere
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Intel settlement means cheap round for anyone who bought Pentium 4 processor
Offer also open to liars. But not Illinois residents.
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Best travel gadgets 2014
A rundown of this year's must-have gizmos for commuters and jetsetters
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung Galaxy A5 and A3 arrive with metal bodies and Android 4.4 Kitkat
Mid-range smartphones look to sway buyers away from the iPhone 6
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

LG Display develops 'world's narrowest' smartphone bezel at 0.7mm
Features on a 5.3in Full HD LCD smartphone panel
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Android Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Andy Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Windows 7 OEM licence availability reaches zero day
From today, it's 8 or 0
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Microsoft Band vs FitBit Charge HR specs comparison
We pit the two latest fitness tracking wearables head to head
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay's Svartholm found guilty in Danish hacking case
Jury rejects remote access plea
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Liberty exposes secret links between GCHQ and the NSA
Papers prove private access deal
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung closes in on Apple's iPad with 18.3 percent of global tablet market
Firm sees a 5.6 percent rise in sales in the third quarter
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Material makeover meets many Android apps as Lollipop launch looms
Plus new Bookmark Manager, and Google Now knows your bank balance
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

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~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

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