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French Company Plans To Heat Homes, Offices With AMD Ryzen Pro Processors
At its Ryzen Pro event in New York City last month, AMD invited a French company called Qarnot to discuss how they're using Ryzen Pro processors to heat homes and offices for free. The company uses the Q.rad -- a heater that embeds three CPUs as a heat source -- to accomplish this feat. "We reuse the heat they generate to heat homes and offices for free," the company says in a blog post. "Q.rad is connected to the internet and receives in real time workloads from our in-house computing platform." The idea is that anyone in the world can send heavy workloads over the cloud to a Q.rad and have it render the task and heat a person's home in the process. The two industries that are targeted by Qarnot include movies studios for 3D rendering and VFX, and banks for risk analysis. Qarnot is opting in for Ryzen Pro processors over Intel i7 processors due to the performance gain and heat output. According to Qarnot, they "saw a performance gain of 30-45% compared to the Intel i7." They also report that the Ryzen Pro is "producing the same heat as the equivalent Intel CPUs" they were using -- all while providing twice as many cores. While it's neat to see a company convert what would otherwise be wasted heat into a useful asset that heats a person's home, it does raise some questions about the security and profitability of their business model. By using Ryzen Pro's processors, OS independent memory encryption is enabled to provide additional security layers to Qarnot's heaters. However, Q.rads are naturally still going to be physically unsecured as they can be in anyone's house. Further reading: The Mac Observer, TechRepublic
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

At Least 1.65 Million Computers Are Mining Cryptocurrency For Hackers So Far This Year
According to new statistics released on Tuesday by Kaspersky Lab, a prominent Russian information security firm, 2017 is on track to beat 2016 -- and every year since 2011 -- in terms of the sheer number of computers infected with malware that installs mining software. From a report: So far in 2017, the company says it has detected 1.65 million infected machines. The total amount of infected computers for all of the previous year was roughly 1.8 million. The infected machines are not just home computers, the firm stated in a blog post, but company servers as well. "The main effect for a home computer or organization infrastructure is reduced system performance," Anton Ivanov, a security researcher for Kaspersky, wrote me in an email. "Also some miners could download modules from a threat actor's infrastructure, and these modules could contain other malware such as Trojans [malware that disguises itself as legitimate software]." Ivanov said that the firm doesn't know how much money has been made overall with this scheme, but a digital wallet for one mining botnet that the company identified currently contains over $200,000 USD.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Department of Energy Invests $50 Million To Improve Critical Energy Infrastructure Security
Orome1 shares a report from Help Net Security: Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing awards of up to $50 million to DOE's National Laboratories to support early stage research and development of next-generation tools and technologies to further improve the resilience of the Nation's critical energy infrastructure, including the electric grid and oil and natural gas infrastructure. The electricity system must continue to evolve to address a variety of challenges and opportunities such as severe weather and the cyber threat, a changing mix of types of electric generation, the ability for consumers to participate in electricity markets, the growth of the Internet of Things, and the aging of the electricity infrastructure. The seven Resilient Distribution Systems projects awarded through DOE's Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium (GMLC) will develop and validate innovative approaches to enhance the resilience of distribution systems -- including microgrids -- with high penetration of clean distributed energy resources (DER) and emerging grid technologies at regional scale. The project results are expected to deliver credible information on technical and economic viability of the solutions. The projects will also demonstrate viability to key stakeholders who are ultimately responsible for approving and investing in grid modernization activities. In addition, the Department of Energy "is also announcing 20 cybersecurity projects that will enhance the reliability and resilience of the Nation's electric grid and oil and natural gas infrastructure through innovative, scalable, and cost-effective research and development of cybersecurity solutions."
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Why Bats Crash Into Windows
According to a new report published in the journal Science, Bats slam into vertical structures such as steel and glass buildings because they appear invisible to bats' echolocation system. Nature reports: Bats rely on echolocation to navigate in the dark. They locate and identify objects by sending out shrill calls and listening to the echoes that bounce back. Greif and his colleagues tested the echolocation of 21 wild-caught greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis) in the lab. The researchers placed a featureless metal plate on a side wall at the end of a flight tunnel. The bats interpreted the smooth surface -- but not the adjacent, felt-covered walls -- as a clear flight path. Over an an average of around 20 trials for each bat, 19 of them crashed into the panel at least once. The researchers also put up smooth, vertical plates near wild bat colonies, and saw similar results. The animals became confused owing to a property of smooth surfaces called "acoustic mirroring." Whereas rough objects bounce some echoes back towards the bat, says Greif, a smooth surface reflects all echolocation calls away from the source. This makes a smooth wall appear as empty space to the bats, until they are directly in front of it. Only once a bat is facing the surface are their perpendicular echoes reflected back, which alerts the bat to its mistake. This explains why some bats attempted to swerve out of harm's way at the last second -- but often too late.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Researchers Catch Microsoft Zero-Day Used To Install Government Spyware
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: Government hackers were using a previously-unknown vulnerability in Microsoft's .NET Framework, a development platform for building apps, to hack targets and infect them with spyware, according to security firm FireEye. The firm revealed the espionage campaign on Tuesday, on the same day Microsoft patched the vulnerability. According to FireEye, the bug, which until today was a zero-day, was being used by a customer of FinFisher, a company that sells surveillance and hacking technologies to governments around the world. The hackers sent a malicious Word RTF document to a "Russian speaker," according to Ben Read, FireEye's manager of cyber espionage research. The document was programmed to take advantage of the recently-patched vulnerability to install FinSpy, spyware designed by FinFisher. The spyware masqueraded as an image file called "left.jpg," according to FireEye.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

J.J. Abrams To Direct Star Wars: Episode IX; Premiere Date Pushed To December 2019
A week after Jurassic World's Colin Trevorrow was ousted from the Star Wars: Episode IX director's chair, a familiar face has stepped in to replace him: J.J. Abrams, the man responsible for successfully rebooting the new trilogy in 2015 with Star Wars: The Force Awakens. From a report: Disney just pushed back the release of Star Wars: Episode IX from May 2019 to December 2019, Deadline reports. The news comes after an announcement today that J.J. Abrams is taking over from Colin Trevorrow as director of the movie. Episode IX, originally slated to premiere on May 24th, 2019, was supposed to be a return to May release dates for the Star Wars franchise. Back in 2015, The Force Awakens was also originally supposed to be released in the summer, but was moved to a December release after Abrams took over screenwriting duties with Lawrence Kasdan (The Empire Strikes Back, Return of the Jedi) and needed more time.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Intel Cuts Cord On Its Current Cord-Cutting WiGig Products
An anonymous reader shares a ZDNet report, which also has some clarification from Intel: It looks like you can add WiGig wireless docking to Intel's dustbin (along with IoT products axed earlier this summer), as the company has discontinued existing products using the 802.11ad wireless standard, according to Anandtech. [Since publishing this report, we've received a statement from Intel clarifying its WiGig support: "We continue to offer current versions of our 802.11ad products, such as the Intel Tri-band Wireless AC 18265 and Gigabit Wireless 10101R antenna module. We remain committed to WiGig and think it has exciting potential for a number of applications, including enabling VR to become wireless, mesh networking and as part of Intel's leading products for 5G."] WiGig was developed several years ago with faster speeds than then-current Wi-Fi standards, but because it relied on the 60GHz channel, its high throughput could only travel over short distances. As a result, it eventually became marketed as a feature for wireless laptop docking stations, and while it received some support from enterprise laptop manufactures like Dell and Lenovo, the technology didn't make a big dent against standard wired laptop docks.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Apple Is Releasing macOS High Sierra On September 25
After updating its website for the iPhone launch event, Apple has confirmed that macOS High Sierra will be released on September 25th. TechCrunch provides a brief rundown of the major changes, most of which are under the hood: The Photos app is still receiving some new features to keep it up to date with the iOS version. There are more editing tools, you can reorganize the toolbar and you can filter your photos by type. If you're a Safari user, my favorite change is that there is a new feature in the settings that lets you automatically block autoplaying videos around the web. Many websites have abused autoplaying video, it's time to stop it. And then, there's a new file system that should make your Mac snappier if you're using an SSD. Mail is compressing messages, Metal 2 should take better advantage of your GPU, Spotlight knows about your flight status, etc. The free update to macOS High Sierra will be available in the Mac App Store.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

'Operational Limitations' In Tesla Model S Played a 'Major Role' In Autopilot Crash, Says NTSB
Mr D from 63 writes from a report via Reuters: The chairman of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said on Tuesday "operational limitations" in the Tesla Model S played a "major role" in a May 2016 crash that killed a driver using the vehicle's semi-autonomous "Autopilot" system. Reuters reported on Monday that the NTSB is expected to find that the system was a contributing factor because it allows drivers to avoid steering or watching the road for lengthy periods of time. The NTSB is also expected to find that Tesla Inc could have taken additional steps to prevent the system's misuse and will fault the driver for not paying attention. "Today's automation systems augment, rather than replace human drivers. Drivers must always be prepared to take the wheel or apply the brakes," NTSB Chairman Robert Sumalt said. The system could not reliably detect cross traffic and "did little to constrain the use of autopilot to roadways for which it was designed," the board said. Monitoring driver attention by measuring the driver's touching of the steering wheel "was a poor surrogate for monitored driving engagement." At a public hearing Tuesday on the crash involving Brown, NTSB said the truck driver and the Tesla driver "had at least 10 seconds to observe and respond to each other."
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

BlueBorne Vulnerabilities Impact Over 5 Billion Bluetooth-Enabled Devices
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bleeping Computer: Security researchers have discovered eight vulnerabilities -- codenamed collectively as BlueBorne -- in the Bluetooth implementations used by over 5.3 billion devices. Researchers say the vulnerabilities are undetectable and unstoppable by traditional security solutions. No user interaction is needed for an attacker to use the BleuBorne flaws, nor does the attacker need to pair with a target device. They affect the Bluetooth implementations in Android, iOS, Microsoft, and Linux, impacting almost all Bluetooth device types, from smartphones to laptops, and from IoT devices to smart cars. Furthermore, the vulnerabilities can be concocted into a self-spreading BlueTooth worm that could wreak havoc inside a company's network or even across the world. "These vulnerabilities are the most serious Bluetooth vulnerabilities identified to date," an Armis spokesperson told Bleeping Computer via email. "Previously identified flaws found in Bluetooth were primarily at the protocol level," he added. "These new vulnerabilities are at the implementation level, bypassing the various authentication mechanisms, and enabling a complete takeover of the target device." Consumers are recommended to disable Bluetooth unless you need to use it, but then turn it off immediately. When a patch or update is issued and installed on your device, you should be able to turn Bluetooth back on and leave it on safely. The BlueBorne Android App on the Google Play Store will be able to determine if a user's Android device is vulnerable. A technical report on the BlueBorne flaws is available here (PDF).
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

A New Way to Learn Economics
John Cassidy, writing for The New Yorker: With the new school year starting, there is good news for incoming students of economics -- and anybody else who wants to learn about issues like inequality, globalization, and the most efficient ways to tackle climate change. A group of economists from both sides of the Atlantic, part of a project called CORE Econ, has put together a new introductory economics curriculum, one that is modern, comprehensive, and freely available online. In this country, many colleges encourage Econ 101 students to buy (or rent) expensive textbooks, which can cost up to three hundred dollars, or even more for some hardcover editions. The project is a collaborative effort that emerged after the world financial crisis of 2008-9, and the ensuing Great Recession, when many students (and teachers) complained that existing textbooks didn't do a good job of explaining what was happening. In many countries, groups of students demanded an overhaul in how economics was taught, with less emphasis on free-market doctrines and more emphasis on real-world problems.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Equifax Lobbied For Easier Regulation Before Data Breach
WSJ reports: Equifax was lobbying lawmakers and federal agencies to ease up on regulation of credit-reporting companies in the months before its massive data breach. Equifax spent at least $500,000 on lobbying Congress and federal regulators in the first half of 2017, according to its congressional lobbying-disclosure reports. Among the issues on which it lobbied was limiting the legal liability of credit-reporting companies. That issue is the subject of a bill that a panel of the House Financial Services Committee, which oversees the industry, discussed the same day Equifax disclosed the cyberattack that exposed personal financial data of as many as 143 million Americans. Equifax has also lobbied Congress and regulatory agencies on issues around "data security and breach notification" and "cybersecurity threat information sharing," according to its lobbying disclosures. The amount Equifax spent in the first half of this year appears to be in line with previous spending. In 2016 and 2015, the company's reports show it spent $1.1 million and $1.02 million, respectively, on lobbying activities. While the company had broadly similar lobbying issues in those years, the liability matter was new in 2017.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Boffins Fear We Might Be Running Out of Ideas
Innovation, fetishized by Silicon Valley companies and celebrated by business boosters, no longer provides the economic jolt it once did. From a report: In order to maintain Moore's Law -- by which transistor density doubles every two years or so -- it now takes 18 times as many scientists as it did in the 1970s. That means each researcher's output today is 18 times less effective in terms of generating economic value than it was several decades ago. On an annual basis, research productivity is declining at a rate of about 6.8 percent per year in the semiconductor industry. In other words, we're running out of ideas. That's the conclusion of economic researchers from Stanford University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In a paper published this week through the National Bureau of Economic Research, "Are Ideas Getting Harder to Find?", economics professors Nicholas Bloom, Charles Jones, and John Van Reenen, and PhD candidate Michael Webb, defy Betteridge's Law of Headlines by concluding that an idea drought has indeed taken hold. "Across a broad range of case studies ... we find that ideas -- and in particular the exponential growth they imply -- are getting harder and harder to find," the authors declare in their paper.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Apple Announces iPhone X With Edge-To-Edge Display, Wireless Charging and No Home Button
At its event in Cupertino, California today, Apple unveiled the iPhone X to mark the 10th anniversary of the iPhone. It brings several new features including an edge-to-edge screen, Qi wireless charging, and Face ID. The Verge reports: Because of its edge-to-edge display, the iPhone has no place for a conventional home button, relying instead on a complex facial recognition system to unlock the phone. Called FaceID, the new system will replace TouchID, the home button sensor that's enabled fingerprint logins since 2013's iPhone 5S. Users can wake the phone by swiping up from the button instead of hitting the button. The same gesture will open the control panel once the phone is awake. The updated iPhone 8 will continue unchanged, including both the home button and TouchID. Apple also unveiled the iPhone 8 and 8 Plus, which are updated versions of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus released last year. These new devices feature glass backs with support for wireless charging. The Verge provides some additional specs and features in its report: Apple has improved the display on the iPhone 8 line, adding the same True Tone technology it offers on the 10.5-inch iPad Pro to automatically adjust the screen based on the ambient light in the room to offer more accurate colors. Internally, Apple has upgraded the processor from the A10 Fusion found in the 7 to the A11 Bionic. It's a six-core chip with two performance cores that are 25 percent faster than the A10, and four performance cores that the company says are 70 percent faster that the old model. There's also a new Apple-designed GPU that's 30 percent faster, with the same performance as the A10 at half the power. On the camera front, there's a new 12-megapixel sensor on the iPhone 8 that is larger, faster, and finally has optical image stabilization. The iPhone 8 Plus also has new sensors, and offers f/1.8 and f/2.8 apertures now. The dual cameras on the 8 Plus also have a new "Portrait Lighting" feature to adjust the lighting for portrait shots. And Apple says that the improvements apply to video, too, with Apple executive Phil Schiller claiming that the new devices have the "highest quality video capture ever in a smartphone," with support for 4K/60fps video. Slow motion videos now support up to 1080p resolution at 240fps, doubling the the iPhone 7's 120fps option. The iPhone 8 will start at $699 for a 64GB model, while the 8 Plus will start at $799 for 64GB of storage. You can preorder these devices starting Friday, September 15th, and they will be released a week later on September 22nd. UPDATE 9/12/17: The iPhone X will be priced starting at $999 for the 64GB variant. Pre-order will be available October 27th with shipments starting November 3rd.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Are Top US Startups Really Startups?
Veteran technology reporter and columnist Om Malik writes: Pitchbook, a data research company has come up with a list of top 14 most valuable startups in the United States. There are no real surprises -- they are all ranked by valuation and they all are valued at north of $4 billion. They are all household names -- barring Outcome Health and Samumed. And they have been around forever. They have thousands of employees and many have billions in revenue. What they are not is liquid on public markets. They have not IPO'd. In a different Silicon Valley, they will all be public companies and they won't be deemed startups. Revenue, growth, relative size, market share -- pick a metric (except for lack of profits in many cases) and you know they aren't really startups. So can we stop calling them startups -- and instead maybe call them VC-backed private companies -- otherwise the label startup loses its meaning.
Slashdot ~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

NewsBone.com
Suggest a feed to syndicate here, or check out what I'm doing over at freshtao.
~Created Wed Sep 13 07:36:36 2017

Apple sets release dates for macOS High Sierra, iOS 11
Aside from new iPhones, theres more Apple news - the company has set release dates for iOS 11 - 19 September - and macOS High Sierra - 25 September. I can't say much about High Sierra - I don't have a Mac - but iOS 11 is an absolute must, especially for iPad users. I've been using it for a long time now on my 2017 iPad Pro 12.9", and I haven't looked back to my laptop since buying it and installing iOS 11 on it. iOS 11 is a huge leap forward for the iPad, and it'll make your tablet feel like a new, and much more capable device.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

Apple introduces iPhone 8, iPhone X
Apple held its iPhone event today, but since the three major leaks got everything right - read our previous items on the leaks to get the full details - there's really not much to add here, other than the pricing for the new iPhones. The 'regular' iPhone 8 will be about €50 more expensive this year, so take that into account when planning your upgrade. The iPhone X (pronounced "ten" by Apple, "ex" by people with good taste), however, carries a very hefty pricetag, especially in Europe and the UK - the base 64GB model is $999 in the US, and a staggering €1159 in Europe (and an equally staggering £999 in the UK). I think it's definitely a nice looking phone, and can certainly hold its own against other small-bezel phones from Samsung, LG, and others (especially others), but especially outside of the US, that's one hell of a price tag. Going over the magic €1000 mark feels like crossing a psychological threshold from high-end brand new smartphone territory into high-end brand new laptop territory, and that's a tough pill to swallow. The additional problem here is that the iPhone 8 simply looks outdated compared to all the minimal bezel phones of this year, and certainly so next to the iPhone X in stores for the iOS users among us. I'm up for contract renewal, and since I'm the kind of person to switch platforms about once a year, I was definitely interested in switching to iOS again by buying the iPhone X. However, that €1159 price tag is way, way beyond the outer limit of my comfort zone.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

iOS 11 GM leak confirms D22
9to5Mac is reporting on a leak of the iOS 11 GM release, which details quite a few things about the new iPhone we could only rumour and guess about up until now. Here we go. W're digging through the iOS 11 GM we received this evening to unpack what we can learn about the D22 'iPhone 8' and the rest of the lineup ahead of Apple's big unveiling on Tuesday. It looks like the infamous HomePod leak left a few surprises for us after all. The first discovery is a stunning set of new wallpapers coming with iOS 11 and the first look at the LTE Apple Watch. Next up: new and confirmed features coming to the OLED iPhone. This is a major leak, and confirms several of the final details regarding the iPhone Pro or iPhone X or whatever the more expensive iPhone will be called. The leak confirms the removal of any form of home button - phyisical or virtual - replacing it with a gesture-based UI, as we talked about before. The power switch will also gain some new features, allowing you to set it up to control things like Siri and Apple Pay. iOS 11 also comes with animated animal emojis, which is a sentence that makes me sad. Among many more things I could link to, the leak also reveals how Face ID - the replacement for Touch ID - will work, and how to set it up. The HomePod leak, the recent Bloomberg story by Mark Gurman, and now this GM leak basically leaves nothing left to the imagination - aside from the name and perhaps pricing. Update: and we have the name too: iPhone X. Apple listened to me (this is a joke).
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

Data of 143 million Americans stolen from Equifax
Equifax Inc. today announced a cybersecurity incident potentially impacting approximately 143 million U.S. consumers. Criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files. Based on the company's investigation, the unauthorized access occurred from mid-May through July 2017. The company has found no evidence of unauthorized activity on Equifax's core consumer or commercial credit reporting databases. Names, social security numbers, birthdays, addresses, driver's license numbers, credit card numbers - this is a very big breach. Interestingly enough, three executives of the credit reporting agency sold their shares in the company days after the breach was discovered.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

LLVM 5.0.0 released
This release is the result of the community's work over the past six months, including: C++17 support, co-routines, improved optimizations, new compiler warnings, many bug fixes, and more. The release notes contain more details.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

Bringing back the iPhone headphone jack - in China
Remember when Scotty Allen built his own iPhone from parts bought in Shenzhen? This time around, he ups the ante and adds a headphone jack to an iPhone 7. He had to design his own custom circuit board, have it printed, and build it into his iPhone 7. It's an amazing project, and it's an incredibly interesting 30 minute video. I've spent the past four months in Shenzhen, China, modifying an iPhone 7 to add a fully functional headphone jack. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time anyone has done anything like this. In April, I decided to finally upgrade my iPhone 6s to an iPhone7 to get better camera quality for the videos I was shooting when I was out on adventures in the industrial markets and manufacturing world. But I was super annoyed that it doesn't have a headphone jack! I already have headphones I really liked, and I didn’t like the idea of having to keep track of an adapter just to use them. So I figured I'd add my own - after all, how hard could it be? It turns out, really really hard. But possible. He sent the circuit board he designed and built to Apple, and open sourced all the schematics needed so those with the right tools and expertise can build it at home.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

Google: it is time to return to not being evil
Jon von Tetzchner, CEO of Vivalvi (and former CEO of Opera): Recently, our Google AdWords campaigns were suspended without warning. This was the second time that I have encountered this situation. This time, however, timing spoke volumes. I had several interviews where I voiced concerns about the data gathering and ad targeting practices - in particular, those of Google and Facebook. They collect and aggregate far too much personal information from their users. I see this as a very serious, democracy-threatening problem, as the vast targeting opportunities offered by Google and Facebook are not only good for very targeted marketing, but also for tailored propaganda. The idea of the Internet turning into a battlefield of propaganda is very far away from the ideal. Two days after my thoughts were published in an article by Wired, we found out that all the campaigns under our Google AdWords account were suspended - without prior warning. Was this just a coincidence? Or was it deliberate, a way of sending us a message? Large technology companies have an immense amount of control over and influence on our society, far more than they - or anyone else, for that matter - care to admit. We're way past the point where governments should step in and start to correct this dangerous situation. It's time for another breakup of the Bell System. It's time we, as society, take a long, hard look at corporations - in tech and elsewhere - and ask ourselves if we really want to be subject to the control of organisations we effectively have no democratic control over. I'm not a proponent of nationalisation, but I am a proponent of breaking up Google, Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, and possibly others (I'm sticking to technology for now) to severely limit their power and influence. The products and services these companies create have become too important and too vital to the functioning of our society, and they should be treated as such. It wouldn't be the first time we, as society, decide a certain product has become too vital to leave in corporations' unrestricted hands.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

Ars Technica's Android 8.0 review
Ars has a very detailed review - more of an in-depth deconstruction, to be honest, and that's a good thing - of Android 8.0 Oreo. Take a closer look at Oreo and you really can see the focus on fundamentals. Google is revamping the notification system with a new layout, new controls, and a new color scheme. It's taking responsibility for Android security with a Google-branded security solution. App background processing has been reined in, hopefully providing better battery life and more consistent performance. There's even been some work done on Android's perpetual update problem, with Project Treble allowing for easier update development and streaming updates allowing for easier installation by users. And, as with every release, more parts of Android get more modularized, with emojis and GPU driver updates now available without an OS update. Saving this one for tomorrow.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

Oracle kills Solaris
Remember, back in December 2016, when there were rumours Oracle was killing Solaris? And how a month later, Solaris effectively switched to maintenance mode, and then to a "continuous deliver model"? The news from the ex-Sun community jungle drums is that the January rumours were true and Oracle laid off the core talent of the Solaris and SPARC teams on Friday. That surely has to mean a maintenance-only future for the product range, especially with Solaris 12 cancelled. A classic Oracle "silent EOL", no matter what they claim. With the hardware deprecated, my guess is that's the last of the Sun assets Oracle acquired written off. Just how good were Oracle's decisions on buying Sun? Sun's Solaris is dead. Bryan Cantrill on this news (this Bryan Cantrill): As had been rumored for a while, Oracle effectively killed Solaris on Friday. When I first saw this, I had assumed that this was merely a deep cut, but in talking to Solaris engineers still at Oracle, it is clearly much more than that. It is a cut so deep as to be fatal: the core Solaris engineering organization lost on the order of 90% of its people, including essentially all management. [...] Judging merely by its tombstone, the life of Solaris can be viewed as tragic: born out of wedlock between Sun and AT&T and dying at the hands of a remorseless corporate sociopath a quarter century later. And even that may be overstating its longevity: Solaris may not have been truly born until it was made open source, and - certainly to me, anyway - it died the moment it was again made proprietary. But in that shorter life, Solaris achieved the singular: immortality for its revolutionary technologies. So while we can mourn the loss of the proprietary embodiment of Solaris (and we can certainly lament the coarse way in which its technologists were treated!), we can rejoice in the eternal life of its technologies - in illumos and beyond!
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

100 days of postmarketOS
We talked about postmarketOS back in late May, and this weekend the project published a summary of all the work they've done over the past 100 days. What you see here is only the tip of the iceberg. So much work has gone into fixing bugs, and little improvements, that it would be ridiculous to go through the effort and list them all. The community has grown so fast in such a short time and we have people with all kinds of skills on board, ranging from Linux experts to kernel hackers to people who reverse engineer bootloaders (hi @McBitter!). We collaborate with people from other projects as well, such as @pavelmachek, who is close to using his N900 as a daily driver with his own distribution, recently just reached out to us. So if you read through the whole post, you are probably interested in what we do. Consider contributing to the project, the entry barrier is really low. pmbootstrap automates everything for you and we are more than happy to help you through any issues you encounter in the chat. There are also a lot of opportunities to help with development, so there's plenty to do. And plenty of fun to have. That's a lot of work for just 100 days.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

ReactOS 0.4.6 released
0.4.6 is a major step towards real hardware support. Several dual boot issues have been fixed and now partitions are managed in a safer way avoiding corruption of the partition list structures. ReactOS Loader can now load custom kernels and HALs. Printing Subsystem is still greenish in 0.4.6, however Colin Finck has implemented a huge number of new APIs and fixed some of the bugs reported and detected by the ReactOS automated tests. Regarding drivers, Pierre Schweitzer has added an NFS driver and started implementing RDBSS and RXCE, needed to enable SMB support in the future, Sylvain Petreolle has imported a Digital TV tuning device driver and the UDFS driver has been re-enabled in 0.4.6 after fixing several deadlocks and issues which was making it previously unusable. Critical bugs and leakages in CDFS, SCSI and HDAUDBUS have been also fixed. That's some solid progress.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

The first commercial Asteroid OS smartwatch revealed
The first ever commercial Asteroid OS smartwatch, Connect Watch, was revealed today by a French company going by the same name. A Wi-Fi only model and a 3G model were unveiled with prices 99€ and 129€ respectively. Sales for these watches will commence tomorrow. Connect watch aims to provide a free watch alternative to the Android Wear and Tizen watches. The watches are capable to function on their own without the need for a smartphone and the 3G model can perform calls as well. Asteroid OS, for those of you who don't know, is a Nemo Mobile based open source smartwatch OS and thus shares a lot of blood with Sailfish OS. Spearheaded by a talented young programmer Florent Revest, The project has matured a lot in 2 years since it inception and garnered lot of interest around the world. Jolla's Sailfish OS for smartwatch demo displayed in Slush 2016 and MWC 2017 was also based on Asteroid OS. No Asteroid OS sync application for Sailfish OS is yet to be in development. It's 2017, and I can post a news item about an alternative operating system shipping on a smartwatch. Today was a good day.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

The next big Windows 10 update will be out on October 17
The Windows 10 Fall Creators Update now has a release date: October 17. Microsoft started finalizing the release last week, and we'd expect this release to follow the pattern seen in previous Windows updates: the final build will be done some time in September and roll out to members of the Windows Insider program's fast, slow, and release preview rings. Then it will hit Windows Update. From there, we'd expect a slow ramp up in availability. Not the most substantial Windows update for regular users, but I do like the faster update cycle for Windows. I'm glad the monolithic releases of yore are gone for most users, while enterprise users are still able to opt for the Long Term Servicing Branch for the more monolithic approach.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

Hardening the kernel in Android Oreo
The hardening of Android's userspace has increasingly made the underlying Linux kernel a more attractive target to attackers. As a result, more than a third of Android security bugs were found in the kernel last year. In Android 8.0 (Oreo), significant effort has gone into hardening the kernel to reduce the number and impact of security bugs. Android Nougat worked to protect the kernel by isolating it from userspace processes with the addition of SELinux ioctl filtering and requiring seccomp-bpf support, which allows apps to filter access to available system calls when processing untrusted input. Android 8.0 focuses on kernel self-protection with four security-hardening features backported from upstream Linux to all Android kernels supported in devices that first ship with this release. Is it common to have to backport security features of newer Linux versions to older ones? Or is this just a peculiarity of Android's Linux kernel being so far behind the times?
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

Genode 17.08 supports Intel Gen-8 GPUs
With version 17.08, the Genode OS project conquers the highly complex topic of hardware-accelerated graphics. In true microkernel fashion, Genode's new Intel-GPU multiplexer provides the bare minimum of functionality to enable (potentially untrusted) components to use the GPU without interfering with each other. Further highlights of the new release are the broadened support for the seL4 microkernel on ARM and 64-bit x86, the ability to boot via UEFI, and Genode's use as Xen DomU domain. Seven years ago, the Genode developers took their first baby steps with the use of hardware-accelerated graphics. However, their original port of the Intel graphics execution manager along with Mesa/Gallium to the Genode user land never outgrew an experimental stage. One particular limitation was that the GPU could only be used by a single application exclusively. At that time, the secure sharing of GPUs among multiple - and potentially malicious - applications was an afterthought in the predominant driver architectures like Linux' DRI. A port of this driver architecture to Genode would not magically solve that. In the meanwhile, hardware features like per-process graphics translation tables (PPGTT) and hardware contexts have proliferated and are now present in all modern Intel GPUs. What MMU-based virtual memory is to a CPU, these features are to a GPU. They in principle allow the sandboxed execution of GPU commands under the regime of a potentially very small GPU driver, analogously to how a microkernel facilitates an MMU to sandbox user-level components. However, with about 100K lines of code, Intel's official i915 driver stack as used in the Linux kernel is far from being small and simple. To put the number in perspective, modern microkernels like seL4 or NOVA consist of merely 10K lines of code. Inflating Genode's trusted computing base by on order of magnitude would be a tough decision. There had to be another way. Hence, one year ago, an experiment was started to develop a clean-slate GPU multiplexer as a Genode component. In contrast to the i915 driver stack that needs to accommodate a mind boggling number of legacy hardware that is still in broad use, Genode's custom GPU multiplexer could do a clear cut by only supporting very recent GPUs. The result is quite reassuring. At far less than 10K of code, Genode's new user-land GPU multiplexer is able to accommodate trusted and untrusted OpenGL applications side by side. The current release features the first version of this component along with several examples. Besides the GPU topic, the new release comes with numerous other improvements. Most noteworthy is the ability to use Genode with the seL4 kernel on the ARM and 64-bit x86 architectures. The upgraded seL4 support also enables SMP on x86, priorities, and Genode's CPU-monitoring facilities. Following up on the big infrastructural changes of the previous releases, the current release comes with gradual refinements of the VFS infrastructure, the timing accuracy, and the package-management tools. The complete picture is presented in the official release documentation.
OSNews ~Created Wed Sep 13 06:15:30 2017

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Pirate Bay founder gets jail term
Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Warg sentenced to three-and-half years in prison after being found guilty of hacking into Danish computers.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Millions hit in Drupal hack attack
Software firm Drupal warns millions to "assume" they have been hacked if they have not applied a patch for a recently discovered bug.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Former Android boss leaves Google
Andy Rubin steps down from Google, while his former colleague Daniel Graf is demoted at Twitter
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Big firms 'must condemn GamerGate'
Games publishers must "stand-up and condemn" the movement referred to as "GamerGate", says a developer forced to leave her home due to threats.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Hungary scraps controversial web tax
Hungary shelves a proposed tax on internet data traffic after tens of thousands of Hungarians marched against it.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Apple chief: 'I'm proud to be gay'
Apple chief executive Tim Cook has publicly acknowledged his sexuality, saying he wants to try to help people struggling with their identity.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Microsoft unveils fitness band
Microsoft unveils a wearable device that can track a user's sleep and exercise as well connect to a fitness tracking service on smartphones.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Data retention bill introduced
Data about phone and computer use will be kept by telecommunications companies for two years if a bill introduced to the Australian parliament is passed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Lenovo completes Motorola takeover
Lenovo completes a $2.9bn takeover of Google's Motorola handset division, which it says makes it the third biggest smartphone maker.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Speed boost for 4G in some cities
Two of the UK's mobile operators are turning on technology that boosts mobile speeds in a few UK cities.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Android smartwatch 'runs for a week'
New Android-powered smartwatches should last for a week or longer between charges thanks to their use of both e-ink and LCD screens.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Drones buzz French nuclear plants
An investigation begins after France's state-owned EDF power company says unidentified drones have flown over seven of its nuclear plants.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

China denies shutting foreign sites
The director of China's internet regulator admits that some foreign websites cannot be visited but denies shutting them down.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Samsung profit lowest in three years
Samsung Electronics sees its quarterly operating profit fall to its lowest level in more than three years because of slowing smartphone sales.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Software 'predicts' gang violence
London's Metropolitan Police test software designed to predict which gang members are most likely to commit violent crimes.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

HP wades into world of 3D printing
HP announces the launch of a 3D printer it says will be 10 times faster than current models.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

White House computers 'hacked'
US security services are reportedly investigating the breach of an unclassified network.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Google developing a cancer detector
Google is attempting to diagnose cancers, heart attack risks and other ailments with a system that combines nanoparticles and a wrist-worn sensor.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Samaritans app flags worrying tweets
An app launched by Samaritans notifies Twitter users if people they follow seem to be distressed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

AUDIO: UK to have new gaming centre
The UK is to have the first cultural centre in the world for gaming, which will be based in Nottingham.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Evolution of a robot care bear
Eight years after a prototype was showcased in Scotland, a robot bear is being trialled in a children's hospital in the US.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Playing music with your brain
Could technology turn you into a musical virtuoso? LJ Rich looks at new ways to make music.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: App helps you wake up with a stranger
The app that turns a global network of strangers into your alarm clock, with a dating twist.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Tech for night-time photography
A look at the latest gadgets which could make it easier to take the perfect night-time picture.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Smart mirror offers wrinkle advice
From mirrors that give advice to wireless kitchen appliances - the devices that could be in the house of the future.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Messaging app to tackle bullying
A school in South Carolina, US has developed an app which it hopes will maker pupils feel safer.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: The 'house of hacking horrors'
A suburban house has been transformed to help specialists find security flaws in smart devices and stop hackers taking control.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: Blass: 'My leaks give phones a buzz'
One of the world's top technology leakers explains how he gathers his secrets.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

VIDEO: 'Whizz up hills' on fast e-bike
A prototype electronic bike (e-bike) which has a battery pack integrated into the frame has been developed.
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

A day without data
Is it possible to not share any information?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Fashion challenge for Apple's Ive
Can Apple design guru Jony Ive turn the smartwatch into a hit?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

The metal detectors saving marriages
The metal detectorists saving marriages
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

How will future city signs look?
Jetpacks, driverless cars and solar roads
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Simulator lets you feel gun's kick
What if you had a killer product on your hands - literally?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Can an app cure anxiety and stress?
Could a simple app banish your stress and anxiety forever?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Giant Samsung struggles at the top
Has the market finally caught up with Samsung?
BBC News - Technology ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:50 2014

Webcast: Navigating QuickBooks 2013 - Mar 19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Katie Cunningham Lynn Root at Let's Learn Python at PyCon - Mar 13-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Being Productive with Windows 8 - Mar 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

O'Reilly Strata Conference - Feb 26-28 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Hybrid Apps with PhoneGap - Feb 21 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Building Rich, High Performance Tools for Practical Data Analysis - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Thinking Big Together: Driving the Future of Data Science - Feb 20 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Christopher Schmitt at In Control Orlando 2013 Mobile and Web Design Conference - Feb 17-19 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing for Data-driven Organizations - Feb 14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Tools of Change for Publishing Conference (TOC) - Feb 12-14 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: How Lean Startups Define, Measure, and Communicate Progress - Feb 8 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Using Windows XP in a Windows 8 Virtual Machine - Feb 7 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Bandit Algorithms for the Web - Feb 5 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: UX Design for Digital Books: Creating Engaging Digital Reading Experiences - Feb 1 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Designing And Creating A Social Book App Using Open-source Technologies - Jan 29 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Core Data

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

EPUB 3 Best Practices

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Windows Server 2012 Inside Out

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Secrets of Product Management - Jan 24 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: So you got a Raspberry Pi for the Holidays - Jan 23 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Data Warfare - Jan 22 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: 10 Steps to Product/Market Fit - Jan 18 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: Principles of Mobile Interface Design - Jan 17 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

The Book of GIMP

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

Webcast: HTML5 for Mobile Devices - Jan 16 2013

New: All Things O'Reilly ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:22:02 2014

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Securing the Black Hat Wi-Fi Network With Aruba's Cloud
Aruba uses new technology to minimize the on-site equipment needed to secure one of the most hostile conference environments in America.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Is Cisco's WPA Migration Mode Leaving Wi-Fi Users at Risk?
Researchers at Black Hat this week warn about a potential threat in Cisco 1200-series wireless access points, but the enterprise networking giant downplays the danger.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Intel Denies Any Reduction in WiMAX Commitment
The chip giant was forced to respond after Asian publication reported the dissolution of Intel's WiMAX promotional group.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Aerohive Revamps Free Online Wi-Fi Planner
With an update to its Wi-Fi planning tool, Aerohive has made it easier for networkers to plan for Wi-Fi deployments. Enterprise Networking Planet's review of the revamped tool says improved report output, a streamlined workflow and better interface make the tool accessible to more people while providing better results.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Meru Expands WLAN Service Assurance Portfolio
Spectrum analysis, security, and monitoring products increase reliability and cut TCO for Meru Virtual Cell WLANs.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Veriwave's WaveDeploy Raises the Bar on WLAN Assessment
Site assessment tool maps per-client application performance for what-if analysis, client certification, and SLA validation.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Google Apologizes for Snaring Wi-Fi Data
Google says it didn't mean to gather unsecured data as its cars roamed the streets putting together Street View images, but the search company learned it was doing just that as a result of a request for an audit from a German privacy authority.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

4G On the Brink of Massive Growth
Whether it's WiMAX or LTE, 4G is going to be growing in the next few years. While the two protocols coexist right now, what's the future going to hold?
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

SiBeam Introduces Wireless Video Streaming Chipset
By combining support two high-speed wireless protocols, the company hopes to usher in new, cheaper forms of high-definition wireless streaming.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

Wi-Fi 2015: Where Is Wireless Networking Going?
With more than 1 billion devices on the market and 802.11n now standardized, what's next for the networking technology? A panel of networking experts at Interop peers into the crystal ball.
Wi-Fi Planet Wi-Fi Planet Wireless News ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:57 2014

FCC chief set for panto horse net neutrality settlement
Oh no he isn't
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Outlook for Mac update arrives with new Word and Excel apps coming next year
But Microsoft recommends deleting Office for Mac 2011 before using it
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Facebook takes to Tor for weird sort of anonymous socialising
It's anonymous, but everyone can see it and it's a bit weird
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Hungary scraps internet tax plans in wake of mass protests
Neelie Kroes welcomes the decision
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm sentenced for CSC hack
Three and a half years for computer hacking
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Amazon beats off Apple in US tablet satisfaction standings
That's one in the i for the handheld market
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Nexus 6 destined to flop owing to high price and pre-order disaster
Google demonstrates how not to release a smartphone
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Drupal flaw could hit millions of sites
Users of web content management system urged to close backdoor access
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

China will move to Linux by 2020 in 'de-Windowsifying' process
Chinese government advisor invents new word
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

iPhone 6 Plus review
Phablet is a welcome addition to Apple smartphone range
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Yosemite users reporting problems with WiFi connectivity
Others bemoan Bluetooth and Handoff issues
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Sony posts huge Q3 loss as smartphone sales continue to slide
But PS4 sales are on the up
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Google must pay Canadian woman over Street View cleavage boobie
Dcolletage will not help anyone find their way anywhere
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Intel settlement means cheap round for anyone who bought Pentium 4 processor
Offer also open to liars. But not Illinois residents.
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Best travel gadgets 2014
A rundown of this year's must-have gizmos for commuters and jetsetters
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung Galaxy A5 and A3 arrive with metal bodies and Android 4.4 Kitkat
Mid-range smartphones look to sway buyers away from the iPhone 6
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

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Features on a 5.3in Full HD LCD smartphone panel
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Android Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Android founder Andy Rubin is leaving Google
Will create an incubator for hardware startups
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Windows 7 OEM licence availability reaches zero day
From today, it's 8 or 0
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Microsoft Band vs FitBit Charge HR specs comparison
We pit the two latest fitness tracking wearables head to head
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Pirate Bay's Svartholm found guilty in Danish hacking case
Jury rejects remote access plea
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Liberty exposes secret links between GCHQ and the NSA
Papers prove private access deal
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Samsung closes in on Apple's iPad with 18.3 percent of global tablet market
Firm sees a 5.6 percent rise in sales in the third quarter
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

Material makeover meets many Android apps as Lollipop launch looms
Plus new Bookmark Manager, and Google Now knows your bank balance
Home - THE INQUIRER ~Created Sat Nov 1 13:21:49 2014

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